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Constructing consistent work-life histories: a guide for users of the British Household Panel Survey

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  • Mare, David C.

Abstract

This paper assembles existing documentation about the data available from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) that can be used to create consistent and complete work-life histories for respondents. It discusses some of the practical and conceptual challenges in deriving consistent work histories from the BHPS data, and documents aspects of the data and its manipulation. It brings together summaries of how other researchers have dealt with the challenges. It also serves to document a newly derived dataset of consistent work life histories. The material in this paper should be seen as a complement to the BHPS Work-Life History files available though the UK Data Archive. It provides background information on the many issues that were dealt with in the creation of those files. The current paper is intended to assist users of the BHPS to understand the inevitable tradeoffs involved in deriving consistent work-life histories, and to make a well-informed judgement about strengths and weaknesses of the Data Archive files for any specific form of analysis. It also provides guidance for enthusiastic users who wish to derive their own versions of the files.

Suggested Citation

  • Mare, David C., 2006. "Constructing consistent work-life histories: a guide for users of the British Household Panel Survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-39, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2006-39
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2006-39.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martinez-Granado, Maite, 2002. "Self-Employment and Labour Market Transitions: A Multiple State Model," CEPR Discussion Papers 3661, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Taylor, Mark P, 1999. "Survival of the Fittest? An Analysis of Self-Employment Duration in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages 140-155, March.
    3. Jäckle, Annette & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Dependent interviewing and seam effects in work history data," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Rob Crouchley & Reza Oskrochi, 2000. "Testing for origin dependence in socioeconomic duration data," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(10), pages 1857-1868, October.
    5. Gillian Paull, 2002. "Biases in the reporting of labour market dynamics," IFS Working Papers W02/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2010. "Job Search, Human Capital and Wage Inequality," 2010 Meeting Papers 723, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Ken Burdett & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Melvyn Coles, 2016. "Wage Inequality: A Structural Decomposition," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 19, pages 20-37, January.
    3. Almudena Sevilla-Sanz & Mark L. Bryan, 2007. "Does Housework Lower Wages and Why? Evidence for Britain," Economics Series Working Papers 331, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Philippe Bracke & Christian Hilber & Olmo Silva, 2012. "Homeownerhip and Entrepreneurship," SERC Discussion Papers 0103, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    5. Schmelzer, Paul, 2011. "Unemployment and occupational mobility at the beginning of employment career in Germany and the UK," IAB Discussion Paper 201125, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Solera, Cristina, 2008. "Combining marriage and children with paid work: changes across cohorts in Italy and Great Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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