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Dependent interviewing and seam effects in work history data

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  • Jäckle, Annette
  • Lynn, Peter

Abstract

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  • Jäckle, Annette & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Dependent interviewing and seam effects in work history data," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2004-24
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2004-24.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The effects of dependent interviewing on responses to questions on income sources," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Taylor, Mark P, 1999. "Survival of the Fittest? An Analysis of Self-Employment Duration in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(454), pages 140-155, March.
    3. Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Validation of survey data on income and employment: the ISMIE experience," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sala, Emanuela & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Lynn, Peter, 2009. ""It is time computers do clever things!" The impact of dependent interviewing on interviewer burden," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Katrin Drasch & Britta Matthes, 2013. "Improving retrospective life course data by combining modularized self-reports and event history calendars: experiences from a large scale survey," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 47(2), pages 817-838, February.
    3. Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Sala, Emanuela, 2009. "When change matters: the effect of dependent interviewing on survey interaction in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Mare, David C., 2006. "Constructing consistent work-life histories: a guide for users of the British Household Panel Survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-39, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Jäckle, Annette, 2005. "Does dependent interviewing really increase efficiency and reduce respondent burden?," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Sala, Emanuela & Lynn, Peter, 2005. "The impact of a mixed-mode data collection design on non response bias on a business survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Emanuela Sala & Peter Lynn, 2009. "The potential of a multi-mode data collection design to reduce non response bias. The case of a survey of employers," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 123-136, January.
    8. Platt, Lucinda, 2005. "Mobility and missing data: what difference does non-response make to observed patterns of intergenerational class mobility by ethnic group?," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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