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Validation of Survey Data on Income and Employment: The ISMIE Experience

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  • Annette Jäckle
  • Emanuela Sala
  • Stephen P. Jenkins
  • Peter Lynn

Abstract

This report derives from the project "Improving survey measurement of income and employment (ISMIE)" which investigates measurement error in survey data on income and employment, using a UK sub-sample of the European Household Community Panel (ECHP). In this paper we describe the process of collecting validation data and the outcomes of the process. Validation data were obtained from two sources: employers' records and government benefit data from the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP). The former provided information on occupation and employment status, gross and net pay, membership of company pension schemes and industry sector. The latter provided histories of benefit receipt and tax credits, for example, child, disability, housing and unemployment benefits, pensions and income support. In the survey interview, respondents were asked for written permission both to obtain their DWP records and to contact their employer. They were also asked to provide information that would facilitate the process of obtaining the validation data: National Insurance number (NINO) and employer contact details. Subsequently, DWP records were extracted using a non-hierarchical matching strategy, based on different combinations of identifying variables obtained in the survey (NINO, sex, date of birth, name and postcode), and a survey of employers was carried out (mail, with telephone follow-up). The representativeness of the validation samples obtained depends on the co-operation of both survey respondents and providers of validation data, as well as errors in the matching process. We report permission rates, proportions providing matching items, match rates for the DWP data and response rates to the employer survey. We identify correlates of these measures of success at each stage of the validation process in terms of substantive characteristics of the survey respondents. Variation by subgroups is identified and implications for the representativeness of the validation sample are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Annette Jäckle & Emanuela Sala & Stephen P. Jenkins & Peter Lynn, 2005. "Validation of Survey Data on Income and Employment: The ISMIE Experience," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 488, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp488
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lynn, Peter & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The contact and response process in business surveys: lessons from a multimode survey of employers in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-12, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Bollinger, Christopher R, 1998. "Measurement Error in the Current Population Survey: A Nonparametric Look," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(3), pages 576-594, July.
    3. Mellow, Wesley & Sider, Hal, 1983. "Accuracy of Response in Labor Market Surveys: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 331-344, October.
    4. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The effects of dependent interviewing on responses to questions on income sources," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Duncan, Greg J & Hill, Daniel H, 1985. "An Investigation of the Extent and Consequences of Measurement Error in Labor-Economic Survey Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(4), pages 508-532, October.
    6. Bound, John & Brown, Charles & Mathiowetz, Nancy, 2001. "Measurement error in survey data," Handbook of Econometrics,in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 59, pages 3705-3843 Elsevier.
    7. Bound, John & Krueger, Alan B, 1991. "The Extent of Measurement Error in Longitudinal Earnings Data: Do Two Wrongs Make a Right?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(1), pages 1-24, January.
    8. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "Linking household survey and administrative record data: what should the matching variables be?," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Stephen P. Jenkins, 2000. "Modelling household income dynamics," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(4), pages 529-567.
    10. Bound, John, et al, 1994. "Evidence on the Validity of Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Labor Market Data," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(3), pages 345-368, July.
    11. Greenberg, David & Halsey, Harlan, 1983. "Systematic Misreporting and Effects of Income Maintenance Experiments on Work Effort: Evidence from the Seattle-Denver Experiment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 380-407, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lynn, Peter & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The contact and response process in business surveys: lessons from a multimode survey of employers in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-12, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Ermisch, John & Gambetta, Diego, 2006. "People's trust: the design of a survey-based experiment," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-34, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. John Ermisch & Diego Gambetta & Heather Laurie & Thomas Siedler & S. C. Noah Uhrig, 2009. "Measuring people's trust," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(4), pages 749-769.
    4. Sala, Emanuela & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Lynn, Peter, 2008. "The development and implementation of a coding scheme to analyse interview dynamics in the British Household Panel Survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Lugtig Peter & Jäckle Annette, 2014. "Can I Just Check...? Effects of Edit Check Questions on Measurement Error and Survey Estimates," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 30(1), pages 45-62, March.
    6. Alexia Meyermann & Jennifer Elsner & Jürgen Schupp & Stefan Liebig, 2009. "Pilotstudie einer surveybasierten Verknüpfung von Personen- und Betriebsdaten: Durchführung sowie Generierung einer Betriebsstudie als nachgelagerte Organisationserhebung zur SOEP-Innovationsstichprob," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 170, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Jäckle, Annette, 2006. "Dependent interviewing: a framework and application to current research," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-32, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Ermisch, John & Gambetta, Diego, 2011. "The Long Shadow of Income on Trustworthiness," IZA Discussion Papers 5585, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Sala, Emanuela & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Measuring change in employment characteristics: the effects of dependent interviewing," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Ermisch, John & Gambetta, Diego, 2010. "Do strong family ties inhibit trust?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 365-376, September.
    11. Jäckle, Annette & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Dependent interviewing and seam effects in work history data," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    12. Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Sala, Emanuela, 2009. "When change matters: the effect of dependent interviewing on survey interaction in the British Household Panel Study," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    13. Jäckle, Annette, 2005. "Does dependent interviewing really increase efficiency and reduce respondent burden?," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    14. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "Linking household survey and administrative record data: what should the matching variables be?," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    15. Sala, Emanuela & Lynn, Peter, 2005. "The impact of a mixed-mode data collection design on non response bias on a business survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    16. Emanuela Sala & Peter Lynn, 2009. "The potential of a multi-mode data collection design to reduce non response bias. The case of a survey of employers," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 123-136, January.
    17. Korbmacher, Julie M. & Schröder, Mathis, 2013. "Consent when Linking Survey Data with Administrative Records: The Role of the Interviewer," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 115-131.
    18. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The impact of interviewing method on measurement error in panel survey measures of benefit receipt: evidence from a validation study," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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