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The impact of interviewing method on measurement error in panel survey measures of benefit receipt: evidence from a validation study

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  • Lynn, Peter
  • Jäckle, Annette
  • Jenkins, Stephen P.
  • Sala, Emanuela

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  • Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The impact of interviewing method on measurement error in panel survey measures of benefit receipt: evidence from a validation study," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2004-28
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2004-28.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bound, John & Brown, Charles & Mathiowetz, Nancy, 2001. "Measurement error in survey data," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 59, pages 3705-3843, Elsevier.
    2. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The effects of dependent interviewing on responses to questions on income sources," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Stephen P. Jenkins & Lorenzo Cappellari & Peter Lynn & Annette Jäckle & Emanuela Sala, 2006. "Patterns of consent: evidence from a general household survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 701-722, October.
    4. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "Linking household survey and administrative record data: what should the matching variables be?," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. Jäckle, Annette & Sala, Emanuela & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Lynn, Peter, 2004. "Validation of survey data on income and employment: the ISMIE experience," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-14, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Figari & Maria Iacovou & Alexandra Skew & Holly Sutherland, 2012. "Approximations to the Truth: Comparing Survey and Microsimulation Approaches to Measuring Income for Social Indicators," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 105(3), pages 387-407, February.
    2. Jäckle, Annette, 2006. "Dependent interviewing: a framework and application to current research," ISER Working Paper Series 2006-32, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Rajat Deb & Prasenjit Deb & Sujit Majumder & Sourav Chakraborty & Kiran Sankar Chakraborty, 2019. "Answering Savings Puzzle About Small Saving Schemes and Mutual Funds: Evidence from Tripura," Metamorphosis: A Journal of Management Research, , vol. 18(1), pages 7-19, June.
    4. Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2013. "Estimating Cash Usage: The Impact of Survey Design on Research Outcomes," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(1), pages 19-44, March.
    5. Pudney, Stephen, 2009. "Participation in disability benefit programmes: a partial identification analysis of the British Attendance Allowance system," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Sala, Emanuela & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Lynn, Peter, 2009. ""It is time computers do clever things!" The impact of dependent interviewing on interviewer burden," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-07, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Sala, Emanuela & Lynn, Peter, 2005. "The impact of a mixed-mode data collection design on non response bias on a business survey," ISER Working Paper Series 2005-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Emanuela Sala & Peter Lynn, 2009. "The potential of a multi-mode data collection design to reduce non response bias. The case of a survey of employers," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 123-136, January.

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