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Estimating Cash Usage: The Impact of Survey Design on Research Outcomes

  • Nicole Jonker


  • Anneke Kosse


We employ a unique dataset of transaction records to analyse the impact of survey set-up on consumers’ payments registration behaviour. Survey data are used for econometric analyses and validated against other payments data. The results reveal that the length of the registration period influences consumers’ registration of payments. Measurement errors are minimised when consumers use a self-reported transaction diary for one single day. Around 40 % of the transactions registered in a one-day survey are missed out in a one-week survey. Apart from payments research, the results are, among others, also relevant for household expenditure and marketing research. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

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Article provided by Springer in its journal De Economist.

Volume (Year): 161 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 19-44

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Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:161:y:2013:i:1:p:19-44
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  1. Von Kalckreuth, Ulf & Schmidt, Tobias & Stix, Helmut, 2009. "Choosing and using payment instruments: evidence from German microdata," Working Paper Series 1144, European Central Bank.
  2. John Gibson, 2002. "Why Does the Engel Method Work? Food Demand, Economies of Size and Household Survey Methods," Working Papers in Economics 02/02, University of Waikato, Department of Economics.
  3. Erich Battistin & Raffaele Miniaci & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "What Do We Learn from Recall Consumption Data?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(2).
  4. David Humphrey & Lawrence Pulley & Jukka Vesala, 2000. "The Check's in the Mail: Why the United States Lags in the Adoption of Cost-Saving Electronic Payments," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 17-39, February.
  5. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The impact of interviewing method on measurement error in panel survey measures of benefit receipt: evidence from a validation study," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  6. van Praag, B M S & Vermeulen, E M, 1993. "A Count-Amount Model with Endogenous Recording of Observations," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(4), pages 383-95, Oct.-Dec..
  7. Alessie, R.J.M. & Gradus, R.H.J.M. & Melenberg, B., 1987. "The problem of not observing small expenditures in a consumer expenditure survey," Research Memorandum FEW 293, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  8. Ron Borzekowski & K. Kiser Elizabeth & Ahmed Shaista, 2008. "Consumers' Use of Debit Cards: Patterns, Preferences, and Price Response," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(1), pages 149-172, 02.
  9. John Gibson & Bonggeun Kim, 2007. "Measurement Error in Recall Surveys and the Relationship between Household Size and Food Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 473-489.
  10. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2003. "Cluster-Sample Methods in Applied Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 133-138, May.
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