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Estimating Cash Usage: The Impact of Survey Design on Research Outcomes

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  • Nicole Jonker

    ()

  • Anneke Kosse

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Abstract

We employ a unique dataset of transaction records to analyse the impact of survey set-up on consumers’ payments registration behaviour. Survey data are used for econometric analyses and validated against other payments data. The results reveal that the length of the registration period influences consumers’ registration of payments. Measurement errors are minimised when consumers use a self-reported transaction diary for one single day. Around 40 % of the transactions registered in a one-day survey are missed out in a one-week survey. Apart from payments research, the results are, among others, also relevant for household expenditure and marketing research. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2013. "Estimating Cash Usage: The Impact of Survey Design on Research Outcomes," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(1), pages 19-44, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:161:y:2013:i:1:p:19-44
    DOI: 10.1007/s10645-012-9200-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Erich Battistin & Raffaele Miniaci & Guglielmo Weber, 2003. "What Do We Learn from Recall Consumption Data?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(2).
    2. Lynn, Peter & Jäckle, Annette & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sala, Emanuela, 2004. "The impact of interviewing method on measurement error in panel survey measures of benefit receipt: evidence from a validation study," ISER Working Paper Series 2004-28, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. van Praag, B M S & Vermeulen, E M, 1993. "A Count-Amount Model with Endogenous Recording of Observations," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(4), pages 383-395, Oct.-Dec..
    4. Ron Borzekowski & K. Kiser Elizabeth & Ahmed Shaista, 2008. "Consumers' Use of Debit Cards: Patterns, Preferences, and Price Response," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 40(1), pages 149-172, February.
    5. Alessie, Rob & Gradus, Raymond H J M & Melenberg, Bertrand, 1990. "The Problem of Not Observing Small Expenditures in a Consumer Expenditure Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 5(2), pages 151-166, April-Jun.
    6. Ulf Kalckreuth & Tobias Schmidt & Helmut Stix, 2014. "Choosing and using payment instruments: evidence from German microdata," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(3), pages 1019-1055, May.
    7. David Humphrey & Lawrence Pulley & Jukka Vesala, 2000. "The Check's in the Mail: Why the United States Lags in the Adoption of Cost-Saving Electronic Payments," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 17(1), pages 17-39, February.
    8. Gibson, John, 2002. " Why Does the Engel Method Work? Food Demand, Economies of Size and Household Survey Methods," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(4), pages 341-359, September.
    9. Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2003. "Cluster-Sample Methods in Applied Econometrics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 133-138, May.
    10. John Gibson & Bonggeun Kim, 2007. "Measurement Error in Recall Surveys and the Relationship between Household Size and Food Demand," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(2), pages 473-489.
    11. Naeem Ahmed & Matthew Brzozowski & Thomas Crossley, 2006. "Measurement errors in recall food consumption data," IFS Working Papers W06/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kosse, Anneke & Vermeulen, Robert, 2014. "Migrants’ Choice of Remittance Channel: Do General Payment Habits Play a Role?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 213-227.
    2. John Bagnall & David Bounie & Kim P. Huynh & Anneke Kosse & Tobias Schmidt & Scott Schuh, 2016. "Consumer Cash Usage: A Cross-Country Comparison with Payment Diary Survey Data," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 12(4), pages 1-61, December.
    3. repec:bla:jconsa:v:51:y:2017:i:1:p:91-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bruno Karoubi & Régis Chenavaz & Corina Paraschiv, 2016. "Consumers’ perceived risk and hold and use of payment instruments," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(14), pages 1317-1329, March.
    5. repec:wly:jmoncb:v:49:y:2017:i:1:p:115-169 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Esselink, Henk & Hernández, Lola, 2017. "The use of cash by households in the euro area," Occasional Paper Series 201, European Central Bank.
    7. Kosse, Anneke, 2013. "Do newspaper articles on card fraud affect debit card usage?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5382-5391.
    8. Jonker, Nicole & Hernandez, Lola & de Vree, Renate & Zwaan, Patricia, 2017. "From cash to cards: how debit card payments overtook cash in the Netherlands," International Cash Conference 2017 – War on Cash: Is there a Future for Cash? 168371, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    9. repec:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:30:p:2989-3004 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Lola Hernandez & Nicole Jonker & Anneke Kosse, 2017. "Cash versus Debit Card: The Role of Budget Control," Journal of Consumer Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 91-112, March.
    11. Naoki Wakamori & Angelika Welte, 2017. "Why Do Shoppers Use Cash? Evidence from Shopping Diary Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 49(1), pages 115-169, February.
    12. Carin van der Cruijsen & Lola Hernandez & Nicole Jonker, 2017. "In love with the debit card but still married to cash," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(30), pages 2989-3004, June.
    13. David-Jan Jansen & Nicole Jonker, 2016. "Fuel tourism in Dutch border regions: are only salient price differentials relevant?," DNB Working Papers 519, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cash usage; Measurement error; Payment behaviour; Survey design; C42; D12; E41;

    JEL classification:

    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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