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Diversity, stability and regional growth in the U.S. (1975-2002)

  • Jürgen Essletzbichler

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    This paper summarizes the theoretical arguments from evolutionary theory and ecological economics to put the trade-off between regional economic diversity and regional economic growth on stronger theoretical foundations. Hypotheses are tested using an empirical model that links regional economic diversity to stability and growth using data on 177 BEA areas of the continental United States during the period (1975-2002).

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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg0513.pdf
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    Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 0513.

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    Length: 27 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2005
    Date of revision: Sep 2005
    Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:0513
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Secretariaat kamer 635, P.O.Box 80.115, 3508 TC Utrecht
    Phone: 030-2531399
    Fax: 030-2532037
    Web page: http://econ.geo.uu.nl

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