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Intra-Household Redistribution of Income and Calorie Consumption in South-Western Nigeria

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  • Adebayo B. Aromolaran

Abstract

This study investigates how per capita calorie intake in low income households of rural southwestern Nigeria responds to changes in total household income and women's share of household income. The study addresses two major questions. First, is calorie-income elasticity large enough to justify the use of income increases as a food/nutrition policy strategy for increasing calorie intake among low income households? Second, what is the potential effect of intra-household redistribution of income from men to women on per capita calorie consumption? My results show that calorie-income elasticity is small and close to zero, implying that income policies may not be the most effective way to achieve substantial improvements in calorie consumption. I also find that increases in women's share of household income are likely to result in marginal declines in per capita food calorie intake, suggesting that income redistribution from men to women would not increase per capita food energy intake in these households.

Suggested Citation

  • Adebayo B. Aromolaran, 2004. "Intra-Household Redistribution of Income and Calorie Consumption in South-Western Nigeria," Working Papers 890, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:890
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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp890.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Akinleye, S.O. & Rahji, M.A.Y., 2007. "Nutrient elasticities among Nigerian households differentiated by income," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 46(2), June.
    2. San Ahmed, Arsalan & Holloway, Garth John, 2017. "Calories, conflict and correlates: Redistributive food security in post-conflict Iraq," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 89-99.
    3. Babatunde, Raphael O. & Qaim, Matin, 2010. "Impact of Off-farm Income on Food Security and Nutrition in Nigeria," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 97332, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE);Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
    4. Santeramo, Fabio Gaetano & Shabnam, Nadia, 2015. "The income-elasticity of calories, macro and micro nutrients: What is the literature telling us?," MPRA Paper 63754, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Mohammad Mahbubur Rahman, 2014. "Estimating the Average Treatment Effect of Social Safety Net Programmes in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(11), pages 1550-1569, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nigeria; Intra-Household Redistribution of Income; Women's Income Share Elasticity; Income Elasticity; Calorie Consumption.;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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