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Currency Misalignments in emerging and developing countries: reassessing the role of Exchange Rate Regimes

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  • Cécile Couharde
  • Carl Grekou

Abstract

This paper re-examines empirically the relationship between exchange rate regimes and currency misalignments in emerging and developing countries. Using alternative de facto exchange rate regime classifications over the period 1980-2012, it finds strong evidence that performance of exchange rate regimes is conditional on the de facto classification. In particular, this paper shows that the effect of monetary arrangements on currency misalignments depends critically on the ability of these classification schemes to capture adequately dysfunctional monetary regimes.

Suggested Citation

  • Cécile Couharde & Carl Grekou, 2016. "Currency Misalignments in emerging and developing countries: reassessing the role of Exchange Rate Regimes," EconomiX Working Papers 2016-31, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
  • Handle: RePEc:drm:wpaper:2016-31
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Currency misalignments; Exchange rate regimes; Emerging and developing countries.;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions

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