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Retired but not Withdrawn: Does Retirement Induce Participation in Social Activities?

Author

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  • Anne Laferrere

    () (INSEE, CREST and Université Paris-Dauphine)

Abstract

Being retired goes with more frequent participation in some social activities such as volunteering or going to a club. It also goes with an increase in the intensity of participation. To conclude about a causal effect of retirement we use the longitudinal SHARE data and an IV strategy. Indeed we find that retiring can be the occasion to engage in a new social activity. More precisely, retirement increases volunteering, club and even training activities. It has little effect on religious, political or community-related involvement. There is very little sign of endogeneity of retirement. Education level and health evolution play a crucial role in most countries. At a time of huge increase in the population of retirees it is important to access the value of their volunteering participation. A conservative estimate translates volunteering into an output of about 6% of the value of pensions for the retirees of our 10 European countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Laferrere, 2014. "Retired but not Withdrawn: Does Retirement Induce Participation in Social Activities?," Working Papers 2014-36, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2014-36
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kunze, Lars & Suppa, Nicolai, 2017. "Bowling alone or bowling at all? The effect of unemployment on social participation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 213-235.
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0510 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Lars Kunze & Nicolai Suppa, 2014. "Bowling Alone or Bowling at All? The Effect of Unemployment on Social Participation," Ruhr Economic Papers 0510, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Retirement; Volunteering; Health; Instrumental Variables; Fixed effect Model;

    JEL classification:

    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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