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Financial liberalization and democracy: The role of reform reversals

  • Campos, Nauro F
  • Coricelli, Fabrizio

The relationship between economic and political liberalization has received a great deal of attention lately, yet the possibility of a non-linear relationship and the role of reversals remain largely neglected. Focusing on democratization and financial reform, this paper offers evidence for a U-shaped relationship across countries, over time as well as in a panel setting using a wide range of estimators for various reform measures. We link this non-linear relationship to the notion of partial or captured democracy. We provide as well econometric support showing that even when de facto is modelled as a function of de jure financial liberalization, this non-linearity obtains.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 7393.

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Date of creation: Aug 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7393
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  1. Giovannini, Alberto & de Melo, Martha, 1993. "Government Revenue from Financial Repression," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(4), pages 953-63, September.
  2. Sergio L. Schmukler & Graciela Laura Kaminsky, 2003. "Short-Run Pain, Long-Run Gain; The Effects of Financial Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 03/34, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Norman Loayza & Romain Ranciere, 2002. "Financial Development, Financial Fragility, and Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 684, CESifo Group Munich.
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  5. Nauro F. Campos & Roman Horváth, 2006. "Reform Redux: Measurement, Determinants and Reversals," Working Papers IES 2006/16, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Apr 2006.
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  8. Nauro F. Campos & Abrizio Coricelli, 2002. "Growth in Transition: What We Know, What We Don't, and What We Should," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 793-836, September.
  9. Ashoka Mody & Abdul Abiad, 2003. "Financial Reform; What Shakes it? What Shapes it?," IMF Working Papers 03/70, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Sayantan Ghosal & Eugenio Proto, 2008. "Democracy, Collective Action and Intra-Elite Conflict," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 08-09, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
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  14. Giavazzi, Francesco & Tabellini, Guido, 2005. "Economic and political liberalizations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1297-1330, October.
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