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Financial Liberalization and Institutional Development

  • Markus Alzer
  • Ramin Dadasov

This paper empirically analyzes the effects of de jure financial openness on institutional quality as captured by indicators on investment risk, corruption level, impartiality of judiciary system as well as the effectiveness of bureaucratic authorities. Using a panel data set of more than 110 countries and a time span from 1984 to 2005, we show that a higher degree of financial openness improves institutional quality in particular by reducing investment risks. We also study the effect of a single liberalization reform on the development of institutional quality. Again, we find evidence for the beneficial impact of financial liberalization with the exception of the level of corruption. We additionally show that if financial liberalization is supported by simultaneous political liberalization, the benign consequences of financial opening for the institutional performance are even larger, while financial deregulation in former socialist countries tends to worsen institutional quality.

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Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Economics & Politics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (November)
Pages: 424-452

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ecopol:v:25:y:2013:i:3:p:424-452
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  1. Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "The Quality of Government," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1847, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  8. Ramin Dadasov & Philipp Harms & Oliver Lorz, 2010. "Financial Integration in Autocracies: Greasing the Wheel or More to Steal?," FIW Working Paper series 048, FIW.
  9. Francesco Giavazzi & Guido Tabellini, 2004. "Economic and Political Liberalizations," NBER Working Papers 10657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  13. Philipp Harms & Philipp Meulen, 2012. "The demographics of expropriation risk," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 809-832, July.
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  19. Hefeker, Carsten & Busse, Matthias, 2005. "Political Risk, Institutions and Foreign Direct Investment," HWWA Discussion Papers 315, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  20. M. Ayhan Kose & Eswar Prasad & Kenneth Rogoff & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "Financial Globalization: A Reappraisal," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 56(2), pages 143-197, June.
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  25. Akira Ariyoshi & Andrei Kirilenko & Inci Ötker & Bernard Laurens & Jorge Iván Canales Kriljenko & Karl Friedrich Habermeier, 2000. "Capital Controls: Country Experiences with Their Use and Liberalization," IMF Occasional Papers 190, International Monetary Fund.
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