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Housing Wealth or Collateral: How Home Value Shocks Drive Home Equity Extraction and Spending

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  • Andersen, Henrik Yde
  • Leth-Petersen, Søren

Abstract

We examine whether unanticipated changes in home values drive spending and mortgage-based equity extraction. To do this we use longitudinal survey data with subjective information about current and expected future home values to calculate unanticipated home value changes. We link this information at the individual level to high quality administrative records containing information about mortgage borrowing as well as savings in various financial instruments. We find that the marginal propensity to increase mortgage debt is 3-5 percent of unanticipated home value gains. We find no adjustment to other components of the portfolio, and we find that mortgage extraction leads to an increase in spending. The effect is driven by young households with high loan-to-value ratios which is consistent with the effect being driven by collateral constraints. Further, we find that the effect is driven by home owners who actively take out a new mortgage. The price effect is magnified among FRM borrowers who have an incentive to refinance their loans to lock in a lower market rate. These results point to the importance of the mortgage market in transforming price increases into spending and suggest that monetary policy can play an important role in transforming housing wealth gains into spending by affecting interest rates on mortgage loans.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersen, Henrik Yde & Leth-Petersen, Søren, 2019. "Housing Wealth or Collateral: How Home Value Shocks Drive Home Equity Extraction and Spending," CEPR Discussion Papers 13926, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13926
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Orazio Attanasio & Andrew Leicester & Matthew Wakefield, 2011. "Do House Prices Drive Consumption Growth? The Coincident Cycles Of House Prices And Consumption In The Uk," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 399-435, June.
    2. Case Karl E. & Quigley John M. & Shiller Robert J., 2005. "Comparing Wealth Effects: The Stock Market versus the Housing Market," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-34, May.
    3. Daniel Cooper, 2013. "House Price Fluctuations: The Role of Housing Wealth as Borrowing Collateral," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(4), pages 1183-1197, October.
    4. Neil Bhutta & Benjamin J. Keys, 2016. "Interest Rates and Equity Extraction during the Housing Boom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(7), pages 1742-1774, July.
    5. Annalisa Cristini & Almudena Sevilla, 2014. "Do House Prices Affect Consumption? A Re-assessment of the Wealth Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(324), pages 601-625, October.
    6. Aditya Aladangady, 2017. "Housing Wealth and Consumption: Evidence from Geographically-Linked Microdata," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(11), pages 3415-3446, November.
    7. Callan Windsor & Jarkko P. Jääskelä & Richard Finlay, 2015. "Housing Wealth Effects: Evidence from an Australian Panel," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(327), pages 552-577, July.
    8. Sumit Agarwal & Wenlan Qian, 2017. "Access to Home Equity and Consumption: Evidence from a Policy Experiment," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(1), pages 40-52, March.
    9. Disney Richard & Gathergood John, 2011. "House Price Growth, Collateral Constraints and the Accumulation of Homeowner Debt in the United States," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-30, September.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Analysis of survey and administrative data; House price expectations; Housing wealth effect; mortgage market;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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