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Intertemporal Consumption and Credit Constraints: Does Total Expenditure Respond to an Exogenous Shock to Credit?

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  • Søren Leth-Petersen

Abstract

There is continuing controversy over the importance of credit constraints. This paper investigates whether total household expenditure and debt is affected by an exogenous increase in access to credit provided by a credit market reform that enabled Danish house owners to use housing equity as collateral for consumption loans. We find that the magnitude of the response is correlated with the amount of equity released by the reform and that the effect is strongest for younger households. Even for this group, the response was moderate. The aggregate effect of the reform was significant but small. (JEL D14, D91, E21)

Suggested Citation

  • Søren Leth-Petersen, 2010. "Intertemporal Consumption and Credit Constraints: Does Total Expenditure Respond to an Exogenous Shock to Credit?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(3), pages 1080-1103, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:100:y:2010:i:3:p:1080-1103 Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.100.3.1080
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Sane Renuka & Thomas Susan, 2016. "The Real Cost of Credit Constraints: Evidence from Micro-finance," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, pages 151-183.
    2. Simon H. Boserup & Wojciech Kopczuk & Claus T. Kreiner, 2016. "The Role of Bequests in Shaping Wealth Inequality: Evidence from Danish Wealth Records," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 656-661.
    3. Kreiner, Claus Thustrup & Lassen, David Dreyer & Leth-Petersen, Søren, 2012. "Consumer Responses to Fiscal Stimulus Policy and Households’ Cost of Liquidity," CEPR Discussion Papers 9161, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Andreas Fagereng & Martin B. Holm & Gisle J. Natvik, 2016. "MPC heterogeneity and household balance sheets," Discussion Papers 852, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Hryshko, Dmytro & José Luengo-Prado, María & Sørensen, Bent E., 2010. "House prices and risk sharing," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 975-987.
    6. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Søren Leth-Petersen & Torben Heien Nielsen & Tore Olsen, 2014. "Active vs. Passive Decisions and Crowd-Out in Retirement Savings Accounts: Evidence from Denmark," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(3), pages 1141-1219.
    7. Meg Adachi-Sato & Chaiporn Vithessonthi, 2016. "Bank Systemic Risk and Corporate Investment," PIER Discussion Papers 17., Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised Jan 2016.
    8. Fuchs-Schündeln, N. & Hassan, T.A., 2016. "Natural Experiments in Macroeconomics," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    9. repec:wly:quante:v:7:y:2016:i:3:p:935-968 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Annalisa Cristini & Almudena Sevilla, 2014. "Do House Prices Affect Consumption? A Re-assessment of the Wealth Hypothesis," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(324), pages 601-625, October.
    11. Thomas H. Jørgensen, 2016. "Euler equation estimation: Children and credit constraints," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(3), pages 935-968, November.
    12. Sodini, Paolo & van Nieuwerburgh, Stijn & Vestman, Roine & von Lilienfeld-Toal, Ulf, 2016. "Identifying the Benefits from Home Ownership: A Swedish Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 11656, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. De Giorgi, Giacomo & Frederiksen, Anders & Pistaferri, Luigi, 2016. "Consumption Network Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 11332, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Georgarakos, Dimitris & Inderst, Roman, 2011. "Financial advice and stock market participation," Working Paper Series 1296, European Central Bank.
    15. Sari Kerr & William R. Kerr & Ramana Nanda, 2015. "House Money and Entrepreneurship," NBER Working Papers 21458, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Boserup, Simon H. & Kopczuk, Wojciech & Kreiner, Claus T., 2016. "Born with a silver spoon? Danish evidence on wealth inequality in childhood," CEPR Discussion Papers 11490, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Adachi-Sato, Meg & Vithessonthi, Chaiporn, 2017. "Bank systemic risk and corporate investment: Evidence from the US," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 151-163.
    18. Herrala, Risto & Yandong, Jia, 2012. "Has the Chinese growth model changed? : A view from the credit market," BOFIT Discussion Papers 5/2012, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    19. Giacomo Masier & Ernesto Villanueva, 2011. "Consumption and Initial Mortgage Conditions: Evidence From Survey Data," BCL working papers 52, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    20. Druedahl, Jeppe & Martinello, Alessandro, 2016. "Long-Run Saving Dynamics: Evidence from Unexpected Inheritances," Working Papers 2016:7, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 27 Sep 2017.
    21. William Elming & Andreas Ermler, 2016. "Housing equity, saving and debt dynamics over the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W16/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    22. Amior, Michael & Halket, Jonathan R, 2012. "Do Households Use Homeownership To Insure Themselves? Evidence Across U.S. Cities," Economics Discussion Papers 8963, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    23. Fulford, Scott L. & Schuh, Scott, 2015. "Consumer revolving credit and debt over the life cycle and business cycle," Working Papers 15-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    24. Claus Thustrup Kreiner & Søren Leth-Petersen, & Louise C. Willerslev-Olsen, 2016. "Financial Trouble Across Generations:Evidence from the Universe of Personal Loans in Denmark," EPRU Working Paper Series 1601, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    25. repec:esx:essedp:718 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth

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    1. Intertemporal Consumption and Credit Constraints: Does Total Expenditure Respond to an Exogenous Shock to Credit? (AER 2010) in ReplicationWiki

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