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Responses to an anticipated increase in cash on hand: Evidence from term loan repayments

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  • d’Astous, Philippe

Abstract

I use account-level credit card and term loan data to analyze consumers’ responses to anticipated increases in cash on hand following term loan run-offs. Financial constraints are elicited using past credit card payment behavior and can explain the response of credit card but not term loan expenditure: unconstrained consumers are 23% more likely to finance new durable goods with term loans after the run-off. The results provide evidence of consumers engaging in sequential term loan borrowing.

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  • d’Astous, Philippe, 2019. "Responses to an anticipated increase in cash on hand: Evidence from term loan repayments," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:108:y:2019:i:c:s0378426619302249
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2019.105649
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    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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