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Migration as a Safety Net and Effects of Remittances on Household Consumption: The Case of Colombia

  • Lina Cardona Sosa

    ()

  • Carlos Medina

    ()

We assess whether international remittances affect Colombian household´s expenditure composition and demand of education. We exploit the migratory wave that took place on late 90s due to one of the deepest crises in Colombian history, along with institutional barriers to migration, to identify the effect of remittances on expenditure composition. The empirical exercises find a positive effect over education, beneficiary households expending about 10% of total expenditure more in education than non beneficiaries. In addition although no effect was found on enrollment rates, we found an important effect on the probability of attending a private, rather that a public, educational institution. Such effect is on average 24% for individuals 5-30 years old, 50% for those attending secondary education, and 40% for those attending higher education. On the other hand, effects over consumption, investment and health expenditure, are nil. Finally, we find important effects of remittances on living standards of beneficiary households.

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Paper provided by BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA in its series BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA with number 003219.

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Length: 44
Date of creation: 01 Oct 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:col:000094:003219
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  1. Borjas, George J & Bronars, Stephen G, 1991. "Immigration and the Family," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 123-48, April.
  2. Alejandro Gaviria, 2004. "Visa Usa: Fortunas Y Extravíos De Los Emigrantes Colombianos En Los Estados Unidos," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 003766, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  3. Mroz, Thomas A, 1987. "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 765-99, July.
  4. Ximena Cadena Ordóñez & Mauricio Cárdenas Santa María, 2004. "Las remesas en Colombia: costos de transacción y lavado de dinero," WORKING PAPERS SERIES. DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 003127, FEDESARROLLO.
  5. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
  6. Heckman, James J. & Robb, Richard Jr., 1985. "Alternative methods for evaluating the impact of interventions : An overview," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 239-267.
  7. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-18, October.
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