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Remittances and Household Expenditure Patterns in Tajikistan: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis

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Abstract

The object of this article is to assess the impact of remittances on household expenditure patterns in Tajikistan. More specifically, the paper applies propensity score matching methods to the 2003 Tajikistan Living Standards Measurement Survey. The results do not provide evidence of a productive use of remittances since neither internal nor external remittances have a positive effect on investment expenditures. Migration and remittances are therefore interpreted as short-term coping strategies that help dependent households achieve a basic level of consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Clemént, Matthieu, 2011. "Remittances and Household Expenditure Patterns in Tajikistan: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 58-87.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:adbadr:2731
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    1. Lina cardona Sosa & Carlos Medina, 2006. "Migration as a Safety Net and Effects of Remittances on Household Consumption: The Case of Colombia," Borradores de Economia 414, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    2. Valero-Gil, Jorge, 2008. "Remittances and the household’s expenditures on health," MPRA Paper 9572, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "New evidence on the role of remittances on healthcare expenditures by Mexican households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 69-98, March.
    4. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Tania Sainz & Susan Pozo, 2007. "Remittances and healthcare expenditure patterns of populations in origin communities : evidence from Mexico," INTAL Working Papers 1450, Inter-American Development Bank, INTAL.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marjan Petreski & Nikica Mojsoska-Blazevski & Maja Ristovska & Edi Smokvarski, 2014. "Youth Self-Employment in Households Receiving Remittances in Macedonia," Working Papers PMMA 2014-08, PEP-PMMA.
    2. Démurger, Sylvie & Wang, Xiaoqian, 2016. "Remittances and expenditure patterns of the left behinds in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 177-190.
    3. Junaid Ahmed & Mazhar Mughal & Stephan Klasen, 2018. "Great Expectations? Remittances and Asset Accumulation in Pakistan," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(3), pages 507-532, April.
    4. Dietz, Barbara & Gatskova, Kseniia & Ivlevs, Artjoms, 2015. "Emigration, Remittances and the Education of Children Staying Behind: Evidence from Tajikistan," IZA Discussion Papers 9515, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Iuliia Kuntsevych, 2017. "Remittances in Ukraine Using Household Data," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp590, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    6. Christian Mumssen & Yasemin Bal Gunduz & Christian H Ebeke & Linda Kaltani, 2013. "IMF-Supported Programs in Low Income Countries; Economic Impact over the Short and Longer Term," IMF Working Papers 13/273, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Iuliia Kuntsevych, 2017. "Remittances, Spending and Political Instability in Ukraine," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp583, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    8. Akpa, Emeka, 2018. "Private Remittances Received and Household Consumption in Ghana (1980-2016): An ARDL Analysis with Structural Breaks," MPRA Paper 87103, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Sophia Kan, 2016. "Improving health in Tajikistan: remittances trump other income," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 206, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    10. Michael Clemens and Timothy N. Ogden, 2014. "Migration as a Strategy for Household Finance: A Research Agenda on Remittances, Payments, and Development- Working Paper 354," Working Papers 354, Center for Global Development.
    11. Junaid Ahmed & Mazhar Mughal, 2014. "How do consumption patterns of foreign and domestic remittance recipients and non recipients compare? Evidence from Pakistan," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 160, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    12. Anghel, Remus Gabriel & Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa, 2015. "Migrants' Remittances: Channelling Globalization," IZA Discussion Papers 9516, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Bouoiyour, Jamal, 2013. "Transferts de fonds, éducation et travail des enfants au Maroc: Une analyse par score de propension
      [Remittances, Education and Child labor in Morocco: A propensity score matching approach]
      ," MPRA Paper 46063, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. repec:gam:jecomi:v:5:y:2017:i:2:p:16-:d:99408 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Kristina Meier, 2014. "Low-Skilled Labor Migration in Tajikistan: Determinants and Effects on Expenditure Patterns," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1433, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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