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Financial Integration Without the Volatility

  • Ricardo Caballero
  • Kevin Cowan

Integration to international capital markets is one of the key pillars of development. However, capital flows also bring volatility to emerging markets. Are there mechanisms to reap the benefits of capital flows without being hurt by their volatility? Are current practices, such as large reserves accumulation, public deleveraging, and export promotion strategies, efficient external insurance mechanisms? In this pa- per we start by documenting the external volatility faced by emerging markets as well as current self-insurance practices, especially among prudent economies. We then provide a simple model that illustrates the inefficient nature of these practices. We argue that with the help of the IFIs in developing the right contingent markets, similar protection could be obtained at lower cost by using financial hedging strategies. We also argue that, at least for now, local governments have an important role to play in the implementation of these external insurance mechanisms.

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Paper provided by Central Bank of Chile in its series Working Papers Central Bank of Chile with number 387.

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Date of creation: Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchwp:387
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  1. Caballero, Ricardo J. & Krishnamurthy, Arvind, 2001. "International and domestic collateral constraints in a model of emerging market crises," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 513-548, December.
  2. Philip R. Lane & G.M. Milesi-Ferretti, 2003. "International Financial Integration," Trinity Economics Papers 20031, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  3. Roberto Rigobon, 2001. "The Curse of Non-Investment Grade Countries," NBER Working Papers 8636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Dany Jaimovich & Ugo Panizza, 2006. "Public Debt around the World: A New Dataset of Central Government Debt," Research Department Publications 4461, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Guillermo Calvo & Alejandro Izquierdo & Luis-Fernando Mejía, 2004. "On the empirics of Sudden Stops: the relevance of balance-sheet effects," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Jun.
  6. Varangis, Panos & Larson, Don, 1996. "Dealing with commodity price uncertainty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1667, The World Bank.
  7. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Haiyan Deng & Alyson C. Ma & Hengyong Mo, 2005. "World Trade Flows: 1962-2000," NBER Working Papers 11040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Larson, Donald F. & Varangis, Panos & Yabuki, Nanae, 1998. "Commodity risk management and development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1963, The World Bank.
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