IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecofin/v39y2017icp78-88.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Capital market liberalization: Optimal tradeoff and bargaining delay

Author

Listed:
  • Dong, Baomin
  • Gu, Xinhua
  • Song, Huasheng

Abstract

Host and investing countries are faced with a tradeoff between growth and volatility arising from capital flows. The host country seeks capital inflows for high growth, yet worries about accompanying volatility so much that it limits capital market opening due to its financial weakness. However, the investing country solicits quick and safe returns from capital outflows by requesting wide foreign openness. It is often observed that one side’s push for opening encounters the other side’s reluctance. We examine how this conflict of interest is resolved for international compromise equilibrium through sequential bargaining between the two sides with private valuations of capital flows. We find that openness bargaining can end up with strategic delay after information revelation. This finding sheds light on certain puzzles in international finance.

Suggested Citation

  • Dong, Baomin & Gu, Xinhua & Song, Huasheng, 2017. "Capital market liberalization: Optimal tradeoff and bargaining delay," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 78-88.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecofin:v:39:y:2017:i:c:p:78-88
    DOI: 10.1016/j.najef.2016.12.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1062940816301905
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. L Alan Winters, 2004. "Trade Liberalisation and Economic Performance: An Overview," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(493), pages 4-21, February.
    2. Ramey, Garey & Ramey, Valerie A, 1995. "Cross-Country Evidence on the Link between Volatility and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1138-1151, December.
    3. Rubinstein, Ariel, 1982. "Perfect Equilibrium in a Bargaining Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 97-109, January.
    4. Sarno, Lucio & Taylor, Mark P, 1999. "The Persistence of Capital Inflows and the Behaviour of Stock Prices in East Asia Emerging Markets: Some Empirical Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 2150, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Kose, M. Ayhan & Prasad, Eswar S. & Terrones, Marco E., 2006. "How do trade and financial integration affect the relationship between growth and volatility?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 176-202, June.
    6. Frederic S. Mishkin, 2007. "Is Financial Globalization Beneficial?," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(2-3), pages 259-294, March.
    7. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9261 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2004. "Capital-market Liberalization, Globalization, and the IMF," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 57-71, Spring.
    9. Robert E. Baldwin, 2004. "Openness and Growth: What's the Empirical Relationship?," NBER Chapters,in: Challenges to Globalization: Analyzing the Economics, pages 499-526 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ricardo Caballero & Kevin Cowan, 2006. "Financial Integration Without the Volatility," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 387, Central Bank of Chile.
    11. Tille, Cédric & van Wincoop, Eric, 2010. "International capital flows," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 157-175, March.
    12. Campion, Mary Kathryn & Neumann, Rebecca M., 2004. "Compositional effects of capital controls: evidence from Latin America," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 161-178, August.
    13. Barry P. Bosworth & Susan M. Collins, 2003. "The Empirics of Growth: An Update," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 113-206.
    14. Peter Blair Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(4), pages 887-935, December.
    15. Anat R. Admati & Motty Perry, 1987. "Strategic Delay in Bargaining," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(3), pages 345-364.
    16. Hélène Rey & Philippe Martin, 2006. "Globalization and Emerging Markets: With or Without Crash?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1631-1651, December.
    17. Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas, 2006. "The Research Agenda: Pierre-Olivier Gourinchas on Global Imbalances and Financial Factors," EconomicDynamics Newsletter, Review of Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(2), April.
    18. Joshua Aizenman & Ilan Noy, 2003. "Endogenous Financial Openness: Efficiency and Political Economy Considerations," NBER Working Papers 10144, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Eswar S. Prasad & Kenneth Rogoff & Shang-Jin Wei & M. Ayhan Kose, 2007. "Financial Globalization, Growth and Volatility in Developing Countries," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization and Poverty, pages 457-516 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Charles Wyplosz, 2002. "How Risky is Financial Liberalization in the Developing Countries?," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 44(2-3), pages 1-26, September.
    21. Sebastian Edwards, 2012. "The Federal Reserve, Emerging Markets, and Capital Controls: A High Frequency Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 18557, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    22. Edison, Hali J. & Warnock, Francis E., 2008. "Cross-border listings, capital controls, and equity flows to emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1013-1027, October.
    23. Bumann, Silke & Hermes, Niels & Lensink, Robert, 2013. "Financial liberalization and economic growth: A meta-analysis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 255-281.
    24. Gu, Xinhua & Huang, Bihong, 2011. "A new approach to capital flows: Theory and evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1050-1057, May.
    25. Chen, Shikuan & Chang, Ming-Jen, 2015. "Capital control and exchange rate volatility," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 167-177.
    26. Shang-Jin Wei & Jiandong Ju, 2006. "A Solution to Two Paradoxes of International Capital Flows," IMF Working Papers 06/178, International Monetary Fund.
    27. Peter C. Cramton, 1992. "Strategic Delay in Bargaining with Two-Sided Uncertainty," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 205-225.
    28. Noy, Ilan & Vu, Tam B., 2007. "Capital account liberalization and foreign direct investment," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 175-194, August.
    29. Abdul Abiad & Ashoka Mody, 2005. "Financial Reform: What Shakes It? What Shapes It?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 66-88, March.
    30. Ding, Ding & Jinjarak, Yothin, 2012. "Development threshold, capital flows, and financial turbulence," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 365-385.
    31. Peter Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Discussion Papers 07-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    32. Sebastian Edwards, 2012. "The Federal Reserve, the Emerging Markets, and Capital Controls: A High‐Frequency Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44, pages 151-184, December.
    33. Abdul d Abiad, 2003. "Early Warning Systems; A Survey and a Regime-Switching Approach," IMF Working Papers 03/32, International Monetary Fund.
    34. Ito, Hiro, 2006. "Financial development and financial liberalization in Asia: Thresholds, institutions and the sequence of liberalization," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 303-327, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial integration; Volatility; Growth; Capital controls; Bargaining;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • F59 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Other

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecofin:v:39:y:2017:i:c:p:78-88. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620163 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.