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Education and Marriage Decisions of Japanese Women and the Role of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act

Author

Listed:
  • Linda N. Edwards

    (Ph.D. Program in Economics, Graduate Center, CUNY)

  • Takuya Hasebe

    (Sophia University, Tokyo, Japan)

  • Tadashi Sakai

    (Hosei University, Tokyo, Japan)

Abstract

Prompted by concordant upward trends in both the university advancement rate and the unmarried rate for Japanese women, this paper investigates whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Act (EEOA), which was passed in 1985, affected women•s marriage decisions either directly or via their decisions to pursue university education. To this end, we estimate a model that treats education and marriage decisions as jointly determined using longitudinal data for Japanese women. We find little evidence that the passage of EEOA increased the proportion of women who advance to university, but strong support for the proposition that it increased the deterrent effect of university education on marriage.

Suggested Citation

  • Linda N. Edwards & Takuya Hasebe & Tadashi Sakai, 2015. "Education and Marriage Decisions of Japanese Women and the Role of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act," Working Papers 7, City University of New York Graduate Center, Ph.D. Program in Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cgc:wpaper:007
    as

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    File URL: http://wfs.gc.cuny.edu/Economics/RePEc/cgc/wpaper/CUNYGC-WP007.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hashimoto, Yuki & Kondo, Ayako, 2012. "Long-term effects of labor market conditions on family formation for Japanese youth," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 1-22.
    2. Edwards, Linda N., 1994. "The status of women in Japan: Has the equal employment opportunity law made a difference?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 217-240.
    3. Yoshio Higuchi, 2001. "Women's Employment in Japan and the Timing of Marriage and Childbirth," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 52(2), pages 156-184, June.
    4. James Raymo, 2003. "Educational attainment and the transition to first marriage among Japanese women," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 40(1), pages 83-103, February.
    5. Edwards, Linda N. & Pasquale, Margaret K., 2003. "Women's higher education in Japan: Family background, economic factors, and the Equal Employment Opportunity Law," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-32, March.
    6. Abe, Yukiko, 2010. "Equal Employment Opportunity Law and the gender wage gap in Japan: A cohort analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 142-155, April.
    7. Suqin Ge, 2011. "Women's College Decisions: How Much Does Marriage Matter?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(4), pages 773-818.
    8. Hasebe, Takuya, 2013. "Marginal effects of a bivariate binary choice model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 298-301.
    9. Kazuyasu Sakamoto & Yukinobu Kitamura, 2007. "Marriage Behavior from the Perspective of Intergenerational Relationships," Japanese Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(4), pages 76-122.
    10. Abe, Yukiko, 2011. "The Equal Employment Opportunity Law and labor force behavior of women in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 39-55, March.
    11. Lars Lefgren & Frank McIntyre, 2006. "The Relationship between Women's Education and Marriage Outcomes," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 787-830, October.
    12. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Peng, Xiujian, 2007. "Japan's fertility transition: Empirical evidence from the bounds testing approach to cointegration," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 263-278, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Mustafa Coban, 2021. "rbprobit: Recursive bivariate probit estimation and decomposition of marginal effects," 2021 Stata Conference 21, Stata Users Group.
    2. Abe, Yukiko, 2018. "Effects of demographic compositional changes on the convergence of female participation rates," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 97-104.
    3. Abe, Yukiko, 2016. "On the convergence in female participation rates," Discussion paper series. A 301, Graduate School of Economics and Business Administration, Hokkaido University.
    4. Yukiko Abe, 2016. "On the convergence in female participation rates," ERSA conference papers ersa16p473, European Regional Science Association.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Equal Employment Opportunity Act; marriage; university education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • K31 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Labor Law

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