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Can Job Search Assistance Improve the Labour Market Integration for Refugees? Evidence from a Field Experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Michele Battisti
  • Yvonne Giesing

    ()

  • Nadzeya Laurentsyeva

Abstract

We conducted a field experiment to evaluate the impact of job-search assistance on the employment of recently arrived refugees in Germany. The treatment group received job-matching support: an NGO identified suitable vacancies and sent the refugees' CVs to employers. Results of follow-up phone surveys show a positive and significant treatment effect of 13 percentage points on employment after twelve months. These effects are concentrated among low-educated refugees and those facing uncertainty about their residence status. These individuals might not search effectively, lack access to alternative support programmes, and may be disregarded by employers due to perceived higher hiring costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Michele Battisti & Yvonne Giesing & Nadzeya Laurentsyeva, 2018. "Can Job Search Assistance Improve the Labour Market Integration for Refugees? Evidence from a Field Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 7292, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7292
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp7292.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bruno Crépon & Esther Duflo & Marc Gurgand & Roland Rathelot & Philippe Zamora, 2013. "Do Labor Market Policies have Displacement Effects? Evidence from a Clustered Randomized Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(2), pages 531-580.
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    5. Joseph-Simon Gorlach & Christian Dustmann & Jerome Adda, 2014. "Migrant Wages, Human Capital Accumulation and Return Migration," 2014 Meeting Papers 679, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Michele Belot & Philipp Kircher & Paul Muller, 2015. "Providing Advice to Job Seekers at Low Cost: An Experimental Study on On-Line Advice," ESE Discussion Papers 262, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    7. Carlo Devillanova & Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini, 2014. "Employment of Undocumented Immigrants and the Prospect of Legal Status: Evidence from an Amnesty Program," Development Working Papers 367, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano, revised 26 Jun 2014.
    8. Fasani, Francesco & Frattini, Tommaso & Minale, Luigi, 2018. "(The Struggle for) Refugee Integration into the Labour Market: Evidence from Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 11333, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Constant, Amelie F. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2005. "Legal Status at Entry, Economic Performance, and Self-employment Proclivity: A Bi-national Study of Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 1910, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Clausen, Jens & Heinesen, Eskil & Hummelgaard, Hans & Husted, Leif & Rosholm, Michael, 2009. "The effect of integration policies on the time until regular employment of newly arrived immigrants: Evidence from Denmark," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 409-417, August.
    11. Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2011. "Immigrant selection and short-term labor market outcomes by visa category," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 451-475, April.
    12. Kalena E. Cortes, 2004. "Are Refugees Different from Economic Immigrants? Some Empirical Evidence on the Heterogeneity of Immigrant Groups in the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 465-480, May.
    13. Sebastian Till Braun & Nadja Dwenger, 2017. "The Local Environment Shapes Refugee Integration: Evidence from Post-war Germany," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 201711, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews, revised 11 Sep 2018.
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    16. Dayanand S. Manoli & Marios Michaelides & Ankur Patel, 2018. "Long-Term Effects of Job-Search Assistance: Experimental Evidence Using Administrative Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 24422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aksoy, Cevat & Poutvaara, Panu, 2019. "Refugees’ Self-selection into Europe: Who Migrates Where?," Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203665, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    2. repec:ces:ifosdt:v:72:y:2019:i:10:p:20-24 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Cevat Giray Aksoy & Panu Poutvaara, 2019. "Refugees’ Self-selection into Europe: Who Migrates Where?," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1901, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    refugees; labour market integration; job search assistance; field experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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