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Long-Term Effects of Job-Search Assistance: Experimental Evidence Using Administrative Tax Data

Author

Listed:
  • Dayanand S. Manoli
  • Marios Michaelides
  • Ankur Patel

Abstract

This paper uses administrative tax data to examine the long-term effects of an experimental job-search assistance program operating in Nevada in 2009. The program required randomly-selected unemployed workers who had just started collecting unemployment insurance (UI) benefits to undergo an eligibility review and receive personalized job-counseling services. The program led to substantial short-term reductions in UI receipt, and to persistent, long-term increases in employment and earnings. The program also affected participants’ family outcomes, including total income, tax filing, tax liability, and home ownership. These findings show that job-search assistance programs may produce substantial long-term effects for participants and their families.

Suggested Citation

  • Dayanand S. Manoli & Marios Michaelides & Ankur Patel, 2018. "Long-Term Effects of Job-Search Assistance: Experimental Evidence Using Administrative Tax Data," NBER Working Papers 24422, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24422
    Note: LS PE
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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