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Banking Crises and Reversals in Financial Reforms


  • Petar Stankov


A number of countries have gone through banking crises since the early 1970s. This work links those episodes with the patterns of various financial reforms within those countries. As banking crises are endogenous, crisis exposures to major trading partners help identify the causality between crises and reforms. Consistent with the previous literature, the results of this work demonstrate that systemic banking crises reverse most financial reforms. However, they do so with various lags, whereas the impact of non-systemic crises is largely insignificant. The main results remain unaffected after numerous robustness checks. A rich set of policy implications is discussed which could help establish a growth-enhancing financial regulatory framework after banking crises.

Suggested Citation

  • Petar Stankov, 2012. "Banking Crises and Reversals in Financial Reforms," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp474, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
  • Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp474

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Abdul Abiad & Enrica Detragiache & Thierry Tressel, 2010. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 57(2), pages 281-302, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Petar Stankov, 2013. "Crises, Reforms and Growth: A Non-Technical Summary of Recent Empirical Work," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 4, pages 55-61, December.

    More about this item


    banking crises; financial reforms; crisis exposure;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • N20 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - General, International, or Comparative


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