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An Empirical Analysis of the Demand for Physician Services Across the European Union

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Abstract

This paper presents parameter estimates for physician services equations using the European Community Household Panel for 12 countries covering the period 1994-1996. The focus is on two specific points: i) the identification of behavioural similarities and differences in the demand for health across the countries; ii) the variability of the demand for health captured through a joint model for all the countries. We find that there are significant differences across countries, although there are also similarities in the effect of variables such as the health stock, labour situation or family structure. An important fraction of the variability of the demand of health services across countries could be explained from differences in age, income, and the role of General Practitioners (GP) as a gatekeepers in the public health system. We also find some evidence of induced demand effects in both the decision to visit and the number of visits to specialists.

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  • Sergi Jiménez-Martín & José M. Labeaga & Maite Martínez-Granado, 2003. "An Empirical Analysis of the Demand for Physician Services Across the European Union," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2003/45, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
  • Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2003_45
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Eve Caroli & Claudio Lucifora & Daria Vigani, 2016. "Is there a Retirement-Health Care utilization puzzle? Evidence from SHARE data in Europe," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def049, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    2. Luiz Flavio Andrade & Thomas Rapp & Christine Sevilla-Dedieu, 2016. "Exploring the determinants of endocrinologist visits by patients with diabetes," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(9), pages 1173-1184, December.
    3. García-Mainar, Inmaculada & Montuenga-Gómez, Víctor M., 2009. "Education returns of wage earners and self-employed workers: Response," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 645-647, October.
    4. Eugene Choo & Michael Denny, 2006. "Prior Conditions, Age and the Impact of Insurance," Working Papers tecipa-259, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    5. José-Ignacio Antón & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo, 2010. "Health care utilisation and immigration in Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(5), pages 487-498, October.
    6. Nolan, Anne & Nolan, Brian, 2007. "Income, Medical Card Eligibility and Access to GP Services in Ireland," Book Chapters,in: Nolan, Brian (ed.), The Provision and Use of Health Services, Health Inequalities and Health and Social Gain Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. Majo, M.C., 2010. "A microeconometric analysis of health care utilization in Europe," Other publications TiSEM 1cf5fd2f-8146-4ef8-8eb5-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    8. Kristian Bolin & Anna Lindgren & Björn Lindgren & Petter Lundborg, 2009. "Utilisation of physician services in the 50+ population: the relative importance of individual versus institutional factors in 10 European countries," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 83-112, March.
    9. Bíró, Anikó, 2013. "Copayments, gatekeeping, and the utilization of outpatient public and private care at age 50 and above in Europe," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 24-33.
    10. repec:eee:touman:v:32:y:2011:i:3:p:555-563 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:joecag:v:6:y:2015:i:c:p:24-43 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Majo, Maria Cristina & van Soest, Arthur, 2012. "Income and health care utilization among the 50+ in Europe and the US," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 28(4), pages 3-22.
    13. Galina Besstremyannaya, 2014. "Heterogeneous effect of coinsurance rate on healthcare costs: generalized finite mixtures and matching estimators," Discussion Papers 14-014, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    14. Aïda Solé-Auró & Montserrat Guillén & Eileen Crimmins, 2012. "Health care usage among immigrants and native-born elderly populations in eleven European countries: results from SHARE," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 741-754, December.
    15. Roberto Montero Granados & José Jesús Martín Martín & Juan de Dios Jiménez Aguilera, 2008. "Horizontal Inequity in Access to Healthcare Services and Educational Level in Spain," FEG Working Paper Series 08/03, Faculty of Economics and Business (University of Granada).
    16. Cylus, Jonathan & Papanicolas, Irene, 2015. "An analysis of perceived access to health care in Europe: How universal is universal coverage?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(9), pages 1133-1144.

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    Keywords

    count data; demand; physician services; latent class model; two-part model;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C42 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Survey Methods

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