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Health care usage among immigrants and native-born elderly populations in eleven European countries: results from SHARE

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  • Aïda Solé-Auró

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  • Montserrat Guillén
  • Eileen Crimmins

Abstract

Differences in health care utilization of immigrants 50 years of age and older relative to the native-born populations in eleven European countries are investigated. Negative binomial and zero-inflated Poisson regression are used to examine differences between immigrants and native-borns in number of doctor visits, visits to general practitioners, and hospital stays using the 2004 Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe database. In the pooled European sample and in some individual countries, older immigrants use from 13 to 20% more health services than native-borns after demographic characteristics are controlled. After controlling for the need for health care, differences between immigrants and native-borns in the use of physicians, but not hospitals, are reduced by about half. These are not changed much with the incorporation of indicators of socioeconomic status and extra insurance coverage. Higher country-level relative expenditures on health, paying physicians a fee-for-service, and physician density are associated with higher usage of physician services among immigrants. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Aïda Solé-Auró & Montserrat Guillén & Eileen Crimmins, 2012. "Health care usage among immigrants and native-born elderly populations in eleven European countries: results from SHARE," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 741-754, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:13:y:2012:i:6:p:741-754
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-011-0327-x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Constant, Amelie F. & García-Muñoz, Teresa & Neuman, Shoshana & Neuman, Tzahi, 2015. "A "Healthy Immigrant Effect" or a "Sick Immigrant Effect"? Selection and Policies Matter," IZA Discussion Papers 9338, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:spr:eujhec:v:19:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s10198-017-0881-y is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Christian Dustmann & Giovanni Facchini & Cora Signorotto, 2015. "Population, Migration, Ageing and Health: A Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1518, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. repec:spr:eujhec:v:19:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10198-017-0870-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0809-y is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Count data; Physician services; Elderly; Immigration;

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