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Health of Immigrants in European countries

Author

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  • Aïda Solé-Auró

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Eileen M.Crimmins

    () (Andrus Gerontology Center, University of Southern California.)

Abstract

The health of older immigrants can have important consequences for needed social support and demands placed on health systems. This paper examines health differences between immigrants and the nativeborn populations aged 50 years and older in 11 European countries. We examine differences in functional ability, disability, disease presence and behavioral risk factors, for immigrants and non-immigrants using data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) database. Among the 11 European countries, migrants generally have worse health than the native population. In these countries, there is a little evidence of the “healthy migrant” at ages 50 years and over. In general, it appears that growing numbers of immigrants may portend more health problems in the population in subsequent years.

Suggested Citation

  • Aïda Solé-Auró & Eileen M.Crimmins, 2008. "Health of Immigrants in European countries," IREA Working Papers 200809, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:ira:wpaper:200809
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    File URL: http://www.ub.edu/irea/working_papers/2008/200809.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Catalina Bolancé & Ramon Alemany & Montserrat Guillén, 2010. "Prediction of the economic cost of individual long-term care in the Spanish population," IREA Working Papers 201011, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Sep 2010.
    2. Constant, Amelie F. & García-Muñoz, Teresa & Neuman, Shoshana & Neuman, Tzahi, 2014. "Micro and Macro Determinants of Health: Older Immigrants in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 8754, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. repec:spr:ijphth:v:62:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s00038-017-0949-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Hill Kulu & Tina Hannemann, 2016. "Why does fertility remain high among certain UK-born ethnic minority women?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(49), pages 1441-1488, December.
    5. Hill Kulu & Amparo González-Ferrer, 2014. "Family Dynamics Among Immigrants and Their Descendants in Europe: Current Research and Opportunities," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 30(4), pages 411-435, November.
    6. Afulani, Patience A. & Torres, Jacqueline M. & Sudhinaraset, May & Asunka, Joseph, 2016. "Transnational ties and the health of sub-Saharan African migrants: The moderating role of gender and family separation," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 63-71.
    7. Antonio Fidalgo & Alberto Holly & Marco Pecoraro & Philippe Wanner, 2016. "A nonparametric analysis of the healthy immigrant effect," IRENE Working Papers 16-15, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    8. Pita Barros, Pedro & Medalho Pereira, Isabel, 2009. "Health Care and Health Outcomes of Migrants: Evidence from Portugal," MPRA Paper 18201, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Aïda Solé-Auró & Montserrat Guillén & Eileen Crimmins, 2012. "Health care usage among immigrants and native-born elderly populations in eleven European countries: results from SHARE," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(6), pages 741-754, December.
    10. D. Lanari & O. Bussini & L. Minelli, 2015. "Self-perceived health among Eastern European immigrants over 50 living in Western Europe," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 60(1), pages 21-31, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigrants; Mortality; Health; Disability; SHARE.;

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