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Latent class models for use of primary care: evidence from a British panel

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  • Teresa Bago d'Uva

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK)

Abstract

This paper models access to and utilisation of primary care using data from the British Household Panel Survey for the period 1991-2001. A latent class panel data framework is adopted to model individual unobserved heterogeneity in a flexible way. Accounting for the panel structure of the data leads to a substantial improvement in fit, and permits the identification of latent classes of users of health care. Analysis by gender shows that men and women respond differently to some factors, in particular, to age and income. There is evidence of a positive impact of income on the probability of seeking primary care. This effect is especially significant in the case of women. For both genders, the marginal effect of income on the propensity to visit a GP is greater for individuals who are less likely to seek primary care. A latent class aggregated count data model for the number of GP visits classifies individuals in three latent classes and shows a positive income effect particularly amongst those with lower levels of utilisation. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2005. "Latent class models for use of primary care: evidence from a British panel," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(9), pages 873-892.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:14:y:2005:i:9:p:873-892
    DOI: 10.1002/hec.1047
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1047
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew M. Jones & Eddy van Doorslaer & Teresa Bago d'Uva & Silvia Balia & Lynn Gambin & Cristina Hernández Quevedo & Xander Koolman & Nigel Rice, 2006. "Health and Wealth: Empirical Findings and Political Consequences," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 7(s1), pages 93-112, May.
    2. Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2006. "Latent class models for utilisation of health care," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(4), pages 329-343.
    3. Monika Sander, 2008. "Is There Migration-Related Inequity in Access to or in the Utilisation of Health Care in Germany?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 147, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    4. Munkin M & Trivedi P. K, 2009. "Incentives and Selection Effects of Drug Coverage on Total Drug Expenditure: a Finite Mixture Approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    5. Óscar Lourenço & Carlota Quintal & Pedro Lopes Ferreira & Pedro Pita Barros, 2007. "A equidade na utilização de cuidados de saúde em Portugal: Uma avaliação baseada em modelos de contagem," Notas Económicas, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra, issue 25, pages 6-26, June.
    6. Hendrik Schmitz, 2008. "Do Optional Deductibles Reduce the Number of Doctor Visits?: Empirical Evidence with German Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 141, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Wouterse, Bram & Huisman, Martijn & Meijboom, Bert R. & Deeg, Dorly J.H. & Polder, Johan J., 2013. "Modeling the relationship between health and health care expenditures using a latent Markov model," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 423-439.
    8. Ayala, Luis & Navarro, Carolina, 2007. "The dynamics of housing deprivation," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 72-97, March.
    9. McLeod, Logan, 2011. "A nonparametric vs. latent class model of general practitioner utilization: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1261-1279.
    10. Samuel L Brilleman & Hugh Gravelle & Sandra Hollinghurst & Sarah Purdy & Chris Salisbury & Frank Windmeijer, 2011. "Keep it Simple? Predicting Primary Health Care Costs with Measures of Morbidity and Multimorbidity," Working Papers 072cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    11. Mickael Bech & Jørgen Lauridsen, 2009. "Exploring spatial patterns in general practice expenditure," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(3), pages 243-254, July.

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