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Exploring spatial patterns in general practice expenditure

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  • Mickael Bech

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  • Jørgen Lauridsen

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Mickael Bech & Jørgen Lauridsen, 2009. "Exploring spatial patterns in general practice expenditure," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(3), pages 243-254, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:eujhec:v:10:y:2009:i:3:p:243-254
    DOI: 10.1007/s10198-008-0125-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Federico Revelli, 2002. "Testing the taxmimicking versus expenditure spill-over hypotheses using English data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(14), pages 1723-1731.
    2. Thomas G. McGuire & Mark V. Pauly, 1991. "Physician Response to Fee Changes with Multiple Payers," Papers 0015, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
    3. Joines, Jerry D. & Hertz-Picciotto, Irva & Carey, Timothy S. & Gesler, Wilbert & Suchindran, Chirayath, 2003. "A spatial analysis of county-level variation in hospitalization rates for low back problems in North Carolina," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(12), pages 2541-2553, June.
    4. Grytten, Jostein & Carlsen, Fredrik & Sorensen, Rune, 1995. "Supplier inducement in a public health care system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 207-229, June.
    5. Joan Costa-Font & Jordi Pons-Novell, 2007. "Public health expenditure and spatial interactions in a decentralized national health system," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 291-306.
    6. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    7. Wennberg, John E. & Barnes, Benjamin A. & Zubkoff, Michael, 1982. "Professional uncertainty and the problem of supplier-induced demand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 16(7), pages 811-824, January.
    8. Phelps, Charles E., 1995. "Welfare loss from variations: further considerations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 253-260, June.
    9. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2007. "Primary physician services--List size and primary physicians' service production," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 721-741, July.
    10. Nolan, Brian, 1993. "Economic incentives, health status and health services utilisation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 151-169, July.
    11. Margherita Giannoni & Theodore Hitiris, 2002. "The regional impact of health care expenditure: the case of Italy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(14), pages 1829-1836.
    12. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Jonsson, Bengt, 2000. "International comparisons of health expenditure: Theory, data and econometric analysis," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 11-53 Elsevier.
    13. Margherita Giannoni & Theodore Hitiris, "undated". "The Regional Impact of Health Care Expenditure: the Case of Italy," Discussion Papers 99/20, Department of Economics, University of York.
    14. Charles F. Manski, 1993. "Identification of Endogenous Social Effects: The Reflection Problem," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(3), pages 531-542.
    15. Kjeld Møller Pedersen & Terkel Christiansen & Mickael Bech, 2005. "The Danish health care system: evolution - not revolution - in a decentralized system," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(S1), pages 41-57.
    16. Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2005. "Latent class models for use of primary care: evidence from a British panel," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(9), pages 873-892.
    17. Nolan, Brian, 1994. "General practitioner utilisation in Ireland: The role of socio-economic factors," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 711-716, March.
    18. Case, Anne C. & Rosen, Harvey S. & Hines, James Jr., 1993. "Budget spillovers and fiscal policy interdependence : Evidence from the states," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(3), pages 285-307, October.
    19. McGuire, Thomas G. & Pauly, Mark V., 1991. "Physician response to fee changes with multiple payers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 385-410.
    20. Dranove, David & Wehner, Paul, 1994. "Physician-induced demand for childbirths," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 61-73, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:wly:hlthec:v:26:y:2017:i::p:63-77 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eibich, Peter & Ziebarth, Nicolas, 2014. "Examining the Structure of Spatial Health Effects in Germany Using Hierarchical Bayes Models," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 305-320.
    3. Andree Ehlert & Dirk Oberschachtsiek, 2014. "Does managed care reduce health care expenditure? Evidence from spatial panel data," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 207-227, September.
    4. Bose, Srimoyee, 2015. "Determinants of Per Capita State-Level Health Expenditures in the United States: A Spatial Panel Analysis," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 45(1).
    5. Matteo Lippi Bruni & Irene Mammi, 2017. "Spatial effects in hospital expenditures: A district level analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26, pages 63-77, September.
    6. Julio Pombo-Romero & Luis Varela & Carlos Ricoy, 2013. "Diffusion of innovations in social interaction systems. An agent-based model for the introduction of new drugs in markets," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 14(3), pages 443-455, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    GP expenditure; Panel data; Reverse causality; Small-area variation; Spatial spillover; I11; I18; D43; C21; C23;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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