IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jhecon/v14y1995i2p207-229.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Supplier inducement in a public health care system

Author

Listed:
  • Grytten, Jostein
  • Carlsen, Fredrik
  • Sorensen, Rune

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Grytten, Jostein & Carlsen, Fredrik & Sorensen, Rune, 1995. "Supplier inducement in a public health care system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 207-229, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:14:y:1995:i:2:p:207-229
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0167-6296(94)00036-4
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Louis F. Rossiter & Gail R. Wilensky, 1984. "Identification of Physician-Induced Demand," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 19(2), pages 231-244.
    2. Karen Davis & Roger Reynolds, 1976. "The Impact of Medicare and Medicaid on Access to Medical Care," NBER Chapters,in: The Role of Health Insurance in the Health Services Sector, pages 391-436 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. T Rice & R Labelle, 1989. "Do Physicians Induce Demand for Medical Service?," Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis Working Paper Series 18, Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA), McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
    4. Cromwell, Jerry & Mitchell, Janet B., 1986. "Physician-induced demand for surgery," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 293-313, December.
    5. Victor R. Fuchs, 1978. "The Supply of Surgeons and the Demand for Operations," NBER Working Papers 0236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Brekke, Kurt R. & Holmås, Tor Helge & Monstad, Karin & Straume, Odd Rune, 2017. "Do treatment decisions depend on physicians' financial incentives?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 155(C), pages 74-92.
    2. Kris De Jaegher & Marc Jegers, 2001. "The physician-patient relationship as a game of strategic information transmission," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 10(7), pages 651-668.
    3. Carl Hampus Lyttkens, 1999. "Imperatives in Health Care: Implications for Social Welfare and Medical Technology," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 25, pages 95-114.
    4. Karlsson, Martin, 2007. "Quality incentives for GPs in a regulated market," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 699-720, July.
    5. Jostein Grytten & Fredrik Carlsen & Irene Skau, 2008. "Primary physicians’ response to changes in fees," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 9(2), pages 117-125, May.
    6. Fredrik Carlsen & Jostein Grytten & Irene Skau, 2003. "Financial incentives and the supply of laboratory tests," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 4(4), pages 279-285, December.
    7. Paolo Buonanno & Matteo M. Galizzi, 2012. "Advocatus, et non Latro? Testing the Supplier-Induced Demand Hypothesis for the Italian Courts of Justice," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 250, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    8. Rune J. Sørensen & Jostein Grytten, 1999. "Competition and supplier-induced demand in a health care system with fixed fees," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(6), pages 497-508.
    9. Léonard, Christian & Stordeur, Sabine & Roberfroid, Dominique, 2009. "Association between physician density and health care consumption: A systematic review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 121-134, July.
    10. Paolo Buonanno & Matteo M. Galizzi, 2009. "Advocatus, et non latro? Testing the supplier-induced demand hypothesis for Italian courts of justice," Working Papers 0914, University of Brescia, Department of Economics.
    11. Lurås, Hilde, 2009. "General Practice: Four Empirical Essays on GP Behaviour and Individuals’ Preferences for GPs," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2004:1, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    12. Antonio Clavero Barranquero & Mª. Luz González Alvarez, 2005. "A survey of econometric models to analyze the demand and utilisation of health care," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 173(2), pages 129-162, June.
    13. Buonanno Paolo & Galizzi Matteo M., 2014. "Advocatus, et non Latro? Testing the Excess of Litigation in the Italian Courts of Justice," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-38, November.
    14. Carlsen, Fredrik & Grytten, Jostein, 2000. "Consumer satisfaction and supplier induced demand," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(5), pages 731-753, September.
    15. David Madden & Anne Nolan & Brian Nolan, 2005. "GP reimbursement and visiting behaviour in Ireland," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(10), pages 1047-1060.
    16. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2007. "Primary physician services--List size and primary physicians' service production," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 721-741, July.
    17. NOGUCHI Haruko & SATOSHI Shimizutani, 2005. "Supplier-Induced Demand in Japan's At-home Care Industry: Evidence from Micro-level Survey on Care Receivers," ESRI Discussion paper series 148, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    18. repec:nip:nipewp:07/2015 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Iversen, Tor & Luras, Hilde, 2000. "Economic motives and professional norms: the case of general medical practice," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 447-470, December.
    20. De Jaegher, Kris & Jegers, Marc, 2000. "A model of physician behaviour with demand inducement," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 231-258, March.
    21. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2001. "Type of contract and supplier-induced demand for primary physicians in Norway," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 379-393, May.
    22. Paul Calcott, 1999. "Demand inducement as cheap talk," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(8), pages 721-733.
    23. Mickael Bech & Jørgen Lauridsen, 2009. "Exploring spatial patterns in general practice expenditure," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 10(3), pages 243-254, July.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:14:y:1995:i:2:p:207-229. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.