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Demand inducement as cheap talk

  • Paul Calcott

    (School of Economics and Finance, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand)

Registered author(s):

    The doctor-patient interaction is analysed in a game of cheap talk. Causes and consequences of imperfect agency are examined. One form of imperfect agency, supplier-induced demand, is a feature of neologism proof equilibria with some parameter values but not with others. The model is used to evaluate two tests that have been used to test for the existence of supplier-induced demand. The analysis suggests that the two tests, which compare the medical utilization of informed and uninformed consumers, are not valid. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 8 ()
    Pages: 721-733

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:8:y:1999:i:8:p:721-733
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    1. Farrell, Joseph, 1986. "Meaning and Credibility in Cheap-Talk Games," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4968n3fz, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    2. Lee, ChoongSup, 1995. "Optimal medical treatment under asymmetric information," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 419-441, October.
    3. Rochaix, Lise, 1989. "Information asymmetry and search in the market for physicians' services," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 53-84, March.
    4. Hay, Joel & Leahy, Michael J., 1982. "Physician-induced demand : An empirical analysis of the consumer information gap," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 231-244, December.
    5. Dranove, David, 1988. "Demand Inducement and the Physician/Patient Relationship," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(2), pages 281-98, April.
    6. Blomqvist, Ake, 1991. "The doctor as double agent: Information asymmetry, health insurance, and medical care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 411-432.
    7. Matthews, Steven A. & Okuno-Fujiwara, Masahiro & Postlewaite, Andrew, 1991. "Refining cheap-talk equilibria," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 247-273, December.
    8. Grytten, Jostein & Carlsen, Fredrik & Sorensen, Rune, 1995. "Supplier inducement in a public health care system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 207-229, June.
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