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Health care utilization and immigration in Spain

Author

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  • Muñoz de Bustillo, Rafael
  • Antón, José-Ignacio

Abstract

The aim of this work is to analyze the use of health care services by immigrants in Spain. Using a nationally representative health survey from 2006-2007 that allows overcoming problems present in previous studies and negative binomial and hurdle models, it is found that there is no statistically significant difference in the patterns of visits to physicians and hospital stays between migrants and natives in Spain. However, immigrants have a lower access to specialists and visit emergency rooms with higher frequency than nationals.

Suggested Citation

  • Muñoz de Bustillo, Rafael & Antón, José-Ignacio, 2009. "Health care utilization and immigration in Spain," MPRA Paper 12382, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:12382
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cristina Fernández & Carolina Ortega, 2008. "Labor market assimilation of immigrants in Spain: employment at the expense of bad job-matches?," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 10(2), pages 83-107, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Giuliana Luca & Michela Ponzo & Antonio Andrés, 2013. "Health care utilization by immigrants in Italy," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 1-31, March.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Giovanni Facchini & Cora Signorotto, 2015. "Population, Migration, Ageing and Health: A Survey," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1518, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & José-Ignacio Antón, 2011. "From Rags to Riches? Immigration and Poverty in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 661-676, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health care; immigration; Spain; access; equity;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General

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