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Extracurricular educational programs and school readiness: evidence from a quasi-experiment with preschool children

Author

Listed:
  • Anna Makles

    () (Wuppertal Research Institute for the Economics of Education (WIB), University of Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, 42119 Wuppertal, Germany)

  • Kerstin Schneider

    () (Wuppertal Research Institute for the Economics of Education (WIB), University of Wuppertal, Gaußstraße 20, 42119 Wuppertal, Germany)

Abstract

This paper adds to the literature on extracurricular early childhood education and child development by exploiting unique data on an educational project in Germany, the Junior University (JU). Utilizing a quasi-experimental study design, we estimate the causal short-term effect of JU enrollment on cognitive outcomes and show that attending extra science courses with preschool classes leads to significantly higher school readiness. Although the size of the effect is relatively small, the results are plausible and pass various robustness checks. Moreover, in comparison with other programs this intervention is cost-effective.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Makles & Kerstin Schneider, 2014. "Extracurricular educational programs and school readiness: evidence from a quasi-experiment with preschool children," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP14012, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:bwu:schdps:sdp14012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Makles & Kerstin Schneider, 2016. "Quiet please! Adverse effects of noise on child development," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP16002, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    early childhood education; early interventions; school readiness;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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