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Discriminación de género en las calificaciones de las escuelas públicas uruguayas

Author

Listed:
  • Marisa Bucheli

    (Departamento de Economía. Facultad de Ciencias Sociales. Universidad de la República (Uruguay))

  • Claudia Contreras

    (Banco Central del Uruguay)

Abstract

This paper analyzed the existence of a gender bias in the final performance’s grading set by teachers of third grade and six-grade of public schools in Uruguay. For this, administrative data, blind test scores (TERCE) and non-blind tests scores (final performance’s grading) of third-grade and sixth-grade of school students are used. The econometric strategy consisted in controlling the performance’s grade with the blind test scores and certain characteristics of the students, the social-economical background, the school’s characteristics, the teacher’s grading of student’s behavior and a dummy of the sex of the child. A bias was found in performance’s grading in favor of men in third-grade but no differences were found in sixth-grade performance’s grading. The different teacher’s behavior in each grade could be a consequence of the matching mechanism between teachers and classes, that would seem to assign the better teachers to sixth-grade.

Suggested Citation

  • Marisa Bucheli & Claudia Contreras, 2018. "Discriminación de género en las calificaciones de las escuelas públicas uruguayas," Documentos de trabajo 2018008, Banco Central del Uruguay.
  • Handle: RePEc:bku:doctra:2018008
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bcu.gub.uy/Estadisticas-e-Indicadores/Documentos%20de%20Trabajo/8.2018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; discrimination; stereotypes; teacher grading; blind-test; education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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