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Educational Evaluation Schemes and Gender Gaps in Student Achievement


  • Torberg Falch

    () (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Linn Renée Naper

    (Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)


This paper investigates whether gender gaps in student achievement are related to evaluation schemes. We exploit different evaluations at the end of compulsory education in Norway in a difference-in-difference framework. Compared to scores at anonymously evaluated central exit exams, girls get significantly higher grades than boys when assessed by their teacher. We find no evidence that the competitiveness of the environment can explain why boys do relatively better at the exam. The gender grading gap is related to teacher characteristics. The results indicate that the teacher-student interaction during coursework favor girls in the teacher grading.

Suggested Citation

  • Torberg Falch & Linn Renée Naper, 2011. "Educational Evaluation Schemes and Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," Working Paper Series 11311, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:nst:samfok:11311

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Terrier, Camille, 2016. "Boys Lag Behind: How Teachers' Gender Biases Affect Student Achievement," IZA Discussion Papers 10343, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Noémi Berlin & Jean-Louis Tavani & Maud Beasançon, 2016. "An exploratory study of creativity, personality and schooling achievement," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 536-556, September.
    3. Simon Søbstad Bensnes, 2015. "You sneeze, you lose: The impact of pollen exposure on cognitive performance during high-stakes high school exams," Working Paper Series 16615, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    4. repec:bla:obuest:v:79:y:2017:i:5:p:654-688 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bensnes, Simon Søbstad, 2016. "You sneeze, you lose:," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 1-13.
    6. Terrier, Camille, 2015. "Giving a little help to girls? evidence on grade discrimination and its effect on students' achievement," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 61696, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Ha Trong Nguyen, 2015. "The evolution of the gender test score gap through seventh grade: New insights from Australia using quantile regression and decomposition," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1507, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    8. Camille Terrier, 2015. "Giving a Little Help to Girls? Evidence on Grade Discrimination and its Effect on Students' Achievement," CEP Discussion Papers dp1341, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    9. Coenen, J. & Van Klaveren, C., 2013. "Better test scores with a same-gender teacher?," Working Papers 47, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
    10. Kaja Høiseth Brugård, 2013. "Does School Choice Improve Student Performance?," Working Paper Series 14513, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    11. Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler, 2015. "Systematic differences across evaluation schemes and educational choice," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 41-55.
    12. Miroslava Federicova, 2015. "Gender Gap in Application to Selective Schools: Are Grades a Good Signal?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp550, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    13. Torberg Falch & Astrid Marie Jorde Sandsør & Bjarne Strøm, 2015. "Do smaller classes always improve students' long run outcomes?," Working Paper Series 16415, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    14. Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2017. "When the opportunity knocks: large structural shocks and gender wage gaps," GRAPE Working Papers 2, GRAPE Group for Research in Applied Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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