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Banks' business model and credit supply in Chile: the role of a state-owned bank

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  • Miguel Biron
  • Felipe Córdova
  • Antonio Lemus

Abstract

During the Global Financial Crisis, banks suffered losses on a scale not witnessed since the Great Depression, partly due to two major structural developments in the banking industry; deregulation combined with financial innovation. In the aftermath of the financial crisis, the regulatory response concentrated on the Basel III recommendations, raising core capital requirements for banking institutions, which affected their business models and funding patterns. Consequently, these changes have had significant implications for how banks grant loans, how they react to monetary policy shocks, and how they respond to external shocks. We find evidence of significant interactions between the bank lending channel and both monetary and global shocks in Chile. These links have changed significantly after the Global Financial Crisis. In particular, they have been shaped by the counter-cyclical behavior of a state-owned bank.

Suggested Citation

  • Miguel Biron & Felipe Córdova & Antonio Lemus, 2019. "Banks' business model and credit supply in Chile: the role of a state-owned bank," BIS Working Papers 800, Bank for International Settlements.
  • Handle: RePEc:bis:biswps:800
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Luis Felipe Céspedes & Roberto Chang & Andrés Velasco, 2020. "The Macroeconomics of a Pandemic: A Minimalist Model," NBER Working Papers 27228, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Antonio Lemus & Cristian Rojas, 2019. "Credit Unions in Chile: What is their Role?," EconomiX Working Papers 2019-27, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    3. Carlos Cantú & Leonardo Gambacorta, 2019. "How do bank-specific characteristics affect lending? New evidence based on credit registry data from Latin America," BIS Working Papers 798, Bank for International Settlements.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bank lending channel; global factors; Banco Estado;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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