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Global value chains: new evidence and implications

Author

Listed:
  • Rita Cappariello

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Alberto Felettigh

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Jo�o Amador

    (Banco do Portugal)

  • Robert Stehre

    (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw))

  • Giacomo Oddo

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Stefano Federico

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Alessandro Borin

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Michele Mancini

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Sara Formai

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Filippo Vergara Caffarelli

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Luca Cherubini

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Bart Los

    (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen)

  • Antonio Accetturo

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Anna Giunta

    (Universita degli Studi Roma Tre)

  • Andrea Linarello

    (Bank of Italy)

  • Andrea Petrella

    (Bank of Italy)

Abstract

The workshop entitled 'Global Value Chains: new evidence and implications' was held in Rome on the 22nd of June 2015. The workshop presented the results of a research project carried out by a group of economists from the Bank's Directorate General for Economics, Statistics and Research. The first session focuses on the structure of global value chains and how they function in the euro area economies. The second and third sessions examine the implications of global value chains on competitiveness and economic performance, respectively. The last session concentrates on specific countries, regions and firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Rita Cappariello & Alberto Felettigh & Jo�o Amador & Robert Stehre & Giacomo Oddo & Stefano Federico & Alessandro Borin & Michele Mancini & Sara Formai & Filippo Vergara Caffarelli & Luca Cherubini , 2016. "Global value chains: new evidence and implications," Workshop and Conferences 21, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:workpa:sec_21
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bancaditalia.it/pubblicazioni/collana-seminari-convegni/2016-0021/atti_workshop_GVCs.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Rappoport, Veronica & Federico, Stefano & Hassan, Fadi, 2019. "Trade shocks and credit reallocation," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103422, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; competitiveness; demand for skills; domestic value added activation; Euro Area; final demand; firm organization; foreign direct investment; Germany; global value chains; industrial firms; input-output tables; International trade; intra-regional differentiation; Italy; market shares; multinational companies; ownership-based competitiveness; trade elasticity; trade in value added; world trade;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • D23 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Organizational Behavior; Transaction Costs; Property Rights
    • E16 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Social Accounting Matrix
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure
    • L60 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

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