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Using standstills to manage sovereign debt crises

  • Aitor Erce-Domínguez


    (Banco de España)

This paper presents a model analyzing the potential for an International Court with powers to declare standstills to mitigate the coordination problem inherent to roll-overs in sovereign debt markets. It is shown that, regardless of the quality of the information handled by such an Institution, the scale of the coordination problem is reduced since its mere existence forces investors to focus on the Court's course of action rather than on other investors' beliefs. Furthermore, the model shows that, in order to avoid moral hazard, the right of recourse to the Court should be made conditional.

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Paper provided by Banco de Espa�a in its series Banco de Espa�a Working Papers with number 0636.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bde:wpaper:0636
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  1. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Guimaraes, Bernardo & Roubini, Nouriel, 2006. "International lending of last resort and moral hazard: A model of IMF's catalytic finance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 441-471, April.
  2. Barry Eichengreen & Kenneth Kletzer & Ashoka Mody, 2003. "Crisis resolution: next steps," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 03-05, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  3. Hans Carlsson & Eric van Damme, 1993. "Global Games and Equilibrium Selection," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000001088, David K. Levine.
  4. Andrew G Haldane & Adrian Penalver & Victoria Saporta & Hyun Song Shin, 2003. "Analytics of sovereign debt restructuring," Bank of England working papers 203, Bank of England.
  5. Andy Haldane & Mark Kruger, 2001. "The Resolution of International Financial Crises: Private Finance and Public Funds," Staff Working Papers 01-20, Bank of Canada.
  6. Saporta, Victoria & Andrew G Haldane & Gregor Irwin, 2003. "Bail-Out or Work-Out? Theoretical Considerations," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2003 181, Royal Economic Society.
  7. Giancarlo Corsetti & Amil Dasgupta & Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2004. "Does One Soros Make a Difference? A Theory of Currency Crises with Large and Small Traders," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 71(1), pages 87-113.
  8. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2004. "Catalytic Finance: When Does It Work?," Yale School of Management Working Papers ysm339, Yale School of Management.
  9. Rochet, Jean-Charles & Vives, Xavier, 2004. "Coordination Failures and the Lender of Last Resort : Was Bagehot Right After All?," IDEI Working Papers 294, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  10. Prasanna Gai & Hyun Song Shin, 2003. "Debt maturity structure with pre-emptive creditors," Bank of England working papers 201, Bank of England.
  11. Ghosal, Sayantan & Miller, Marcus, 2003. "Coordination Failure, Moral Hazard and Sovereign Bankruptcy Procedures," CEPR Discussion Papers 3729, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Marcus Miller & Lei Zhang, 1999. "Sovereign Liquidity Crisis: The Strategic Case for a Payments Standstill," CSGR Working papers series 35/99, Centre for the Study of Globalisation and Regionalisation (CSGR), University of Warwick.
  13. Hyun Song Shin & Prasanna Gai & Simon Hayes, 2001. "Crisis costs and debtor discipline: the efficacy of public policy in sovereign debt crises," FMG Discussion Papers dp390, Financial Markets Group.
  14. Christina E. Bannier, 2003. "Private and Public Information in Self-Fulfilling Currency Crises," International Finance 0309006, EconWPA.
  15. Michael Chui & Prasanna Gui & Andrew G Haldane, 2000. "Sovereign liquidity crises: analytics and implications for public policy," Bank of England working papers 121, Bank of England.
  16. Vives, Xavier, 2004. "Complementarities and Games: New Developments," CEPR Discussion Papers 4742, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  17. Stephen Morris & Hyun Song Shin, 2001. "Rethinking Multiple Equilibria in Macroeconomic Modeling," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, Volume 15, pages 139-182 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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