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Traditional and Matter-of-fact Financial Frictions in a DSGE Model for Brazil: the role of macroprudential instruments and monetary policy

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  • Fabia A. de Carvalho
  • Marcos R. Castro
  • Silvio M. A. Costa

Abstract

This paper investigates the transmission channel of macroprudential instruments in a closed-economy DSGE model with a rich set of financial frictions. Banks' decisions on risky retail loan concessions are based on borrowers' capacity to settle their debt with labor income. We also introduce frictions in banks' optimal choices of balance sheet composition to better reproduce banks' strategic reactions to changes in funding costs, in risk perception and in the regulatory environment. The model is able to reproduce not only price effects from macroprudential policies, but also quantity effects. The model is estimated with Brazilian data using Bayesian techniques. Unanticipated changes in reserve requirements have important quantitative effects, especially on banks' optimal asset allocation and on the choice of funding. This result holds true even for required reserves deposited at the central bank that are remunerated at the base rate. Changes in required core capital substantially impact the real economy and banks' balance sheet. When there is a lag between announcements and actual implementation of increased capital requirement ratios, agents immediately engage in anticipatory behavior. Banks immediately start to retain dividends so as to smooth the impact of higher required capital on their assets, more particularly on loans. The impact on the real economy also shifts to nearer horizons. Announcements that allow the new regulation on required capital to be anticipated also improve banks' risk positions, since banks achieve higher capital adequacy ratios right after the announcement and throughout the impact period. The effects of regulatory changes to risk weights on bank assets are not constrained to impact the segment whose risk was reassessed. We compare the model responses with those generated by models with collateral constraints traditionally used in the literature. The choice of collateral constraint is found to have important implications for the transmission of shocks to the economy

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  • Fabia A. de Carvalho & Marcos R. Castro & Silvio M. A. Costa, 2013. "Traditional and Matter-of-fact Financial Frictions in a DSGE Model for Brazil: the role of macroprudential instruments and monetary policy," Working Papers Series 336, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:bcb:wpaper:336
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Arruda, Gustavo & Lima, Daniela Cunha de & Teles, Vladimir Kuhl, 2015. "Household borrowing constraints and monetary policy in emerging economies," Textos para discussão 375, FGV/EESP - Escola de Economia de São Paulo, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
    2. Pedro Lutz Ramos & Marcelo Savino Portugal, 2016. "Choques Antecipados De Política Monetária, Forward Guidance E Políticas De Estabilização Macroeconômicas," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 043, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. Agénor, Pierre-Richard & Alper, Koray & Pereira da Silva, Luiz, 2018. "External shocks, financial volatility and reserve requirements in an open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 23-43.
    4. Fabia A. de Carvalho & Marcos R. Castro, 2016. "Macroprudential Policy Transmission and Interaction with Fiscal and Monetary Policy in an Emerging Economy: a DSGE model for Brazil," Working Papers Series 453, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    5. Carlos Viana de Carvalho & Eduardo Zilberman & Laura Candido de Souza & Nilda Mercedes Cabrera Pasca, 2014. "Macroeconomic Effects of Credit Deepening in Latin America," Textos para discussão 629, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    6. Valerio Nispi Landi, 2017. "Capital controls, macroprudential measures and monetary policy interactions in an emerging economy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1154, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    7. Leonardo Nogueira Ferreira & Márcio Issao Nakane, 2015. "Macroprudential Policy in a DSGE Model: anchoring the countercyclical capital buffer," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2015_45, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    8. Carlos Viana de Carvalho & Eduardo Zilberman & Laura Candido de Souza & Nilda Mercedes Cabrera Pasca, 2014. "Macroeconomic Effects of Credit Deepening in Latin America," Textos para discussão 629, Department of Economics PUC-Rio (Brazil).
    9. Grodecka, Anna, 2017. "On the effectiveness of loan-to-value regulation in a multiconstraint framework," Working Paper Series 347, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    10. Horacio A. Aguirre & Emilio F. Blanco, 2015. "Credit and Macroprudential Policy in an Emerging Economy: a Structural Model Assessment," BIS Working Papers 504, Bank for International Settlements.
    11. Georgiadis, Georgios & Jančoková, Martina, 2017. "Financial globalisation, monetary policy spillovers and macro-modelling: tales from 1001 shocks," Working Paper Series 2082, European Central Bank.
    12. Fernando da Silva Vinhado & José Angelo Divino, 2015. "Monetary and Macroprudential Policies: Empirical Evidences from Panel-VAR," Brazilian Review of Finance, Brazilian Society of Finance, vol. 13(4), pages 691-731.
    13. Primus, Keyra, 2017. "Excess reserves, monetary policy and financial volatility," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 153-168.
    14. Fabia A. de Carvalho & Marcos R. Castro, 2015. "Foreign Capital Flows, Credit Growth and Macroprudential Policy in a DSGE Model with Traditional and Matter-of-Fact Financial Frictions," Working Papers Series 387, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.
    15. Horacio Aguirre & Emilio Blanco, 2016. "Financial Stability and Macroprudential Policy: A Structural Model Evaluation of an Emerging Economy," BCRA Working Paper Series 201671, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department.
    16. Bank for International Settlements, 2016. "Experiences with the ex ante appraisal of macroprudential instruments," CGFS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 56, April.

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