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Canadian Policy Analysis Model: CPAM

  • Richard Black
  • David Rose
Registered author(s):

    This paper documents the structure and properties of the Canadian Policy Analysis Model (CPAM). CPAM is designed to provide a reasonably complete representation of the Canadian macro economy. It is a one-domestic-good, small-open-economy model, which features an endogenous supply side, behavioural equations for the principal components of demand, forward-looking expectations, and reaction functions for both the monetary and fiscal authorities. The model has an explicit steady state and is dynamically stable over a wide range of disturbances. CPAM is similar in many ways to the Bank of Canada's Quarterly Projection Model (QPM), and it has been calibrated to reflect QPM's dynamic properties in deterministic simulations. CPAM is smaller, however, and has been configured to simulate much faster than QPM so that stochastic simulations on a large scale are feasible.

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    File URL: http://www.bankofcanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/wp97-16.pdf
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    Paper provided by Bank of Canada in its series Working Papers with number 97-16.

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    Length: 77 pages
    Date of creation: 1997
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:bca:bocawp:97-16
    Contact details of provider: Postal: 234 Wellington Street, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0G9, Canada
    Phone: 613 782-8845
    Fax: 613 782-8874
    Web page: http://www.bank-banque-canada.ca/

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    1. Fuhrer, Jeff & Moore, George, 1995. "Inflation Persistence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(1), pages 127-59, February.
    2. Douglas Laxton & Guy Meredith & David Rose, 1995. "Asymmetric Effects of Economic Activity on Inflation: Evidence and Policy Implications," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(2), pages 344-374, June.
    3. Smyth, David J, 1984. "Short-Run Employment Functions When the Speed of Adjustment Depends on the Unemployment Rate," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 66(1), pages 138-42, February.
    4. Tiff Macklem & Alain Paquet & Louis Phaneuf, 1996. "Asymmetric Effects of Monetary Policy: Evidence from the Yield Curve," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 42, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
    5. P Clark & D Laxton, 1997. "Phillips Curves," CEP Discussion Papers dp0344, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Willem H. Buiter & Marcus H. Miller, 1983. "Costs and Benefits of an Anti-Inflationary Policy: Questions and Issues," NBER Working Papers 1252, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Douglas Laxton & Guy Debelle, 1996. "Is the Phillips Curve Really a Curve? Some Evidence for Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States," IMF Working Papers 96/111, International Monetary Fund.
    8. P.A. Tinsley, 1993. "Fitting both data and theories: polynomial adjustment costs and error- correction decision rules," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 93-21, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. Taylor, John B, 1980. "Aggregate Dynamics and Staggered Contracts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(1), pages 1-23, February.
    10. Douglas Laxton & Peter B. Clark & David Rose, 1995. "Asymmetry in the U.S. Output-Inflation Nexus; Issues and Evidence," IMF Working Papers 95/76, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Weil, Philippe, 1989. "Overlapping families of infinitely-lived agents," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 183-198, March.
    12. Stephen Poloz & David Rose & Robert Tetlow, 1994. "The Bank of Canada's new Quarterly Projection Model (QPM): An introduction," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 1994(Autumn), pages 23-38.
    13. Pesaran, M Hashem, 1991. "Costly Adjustment under Rational Expectations: A Generalization," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(2), pages 353-58, May.
    14. Douglas Laxton & Peter B. Clark, 1997. "Phillips Curves, Phillips Lines and the Unemplyment Costs of Overheating," IMF Working Papers 97/17, International Monetary Fund.
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