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Gender- and Frame-specific Audience Effects in Dictator Games

Author

Listed:
  • Jonathan E. Alevy

    () (Department of Economics, College of Business and Public Policy, University of Alaska Anchorage)

  • Francis L. Jeffries

    () (College of Business and Public Policy, University of Alaska Anchorage)

  • Yonggang Lu

    () (College of Business and Public Policy, University of Alaska Anchorage)

Abstract

We study dictator allocations using a 2x2 experimental design that varies the level of anonymity and the choice set, allowing observation of audience effects in both give and take frames. Changes in the distribution of responses across treatment cells allow us to distinguish among alternative motives as elaborated in recent theory. We observe significant audience effects that vary by both frame and gender. The pattern of responses suggests that heterogeneous concerns for reputation and self-signaling across gender give rise to the contextual effects associated with the give and take frames that have previously been observed in the literature .

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan E. Alevy & Francis L. Jeffries & Yonggang Lu, 2013. "Gender- and Frame-specific Audience Effects in Dictator Games," Working Papers 2013-02, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ala:wpaper:2013-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Subhasish M. Chowdhury & Joo Young Jeon & Bibhas Saha, 2016. "Gender differences in the giving and taking variants of the dictator game," Working Paper series, University of East Anglia, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) 14-09R, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    2. Müller, Stephan & Rau, Holger A., 2015. "Risk-tolerant women donate more than men: Experimental evidence of dictator games," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 264, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    3. Subhasish M. Chowdhury & Joo Young Jeon & Bibhas Saha, 2014. "Eye-image in Experiments: Social Cue or Experimenter Demand Effect?," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 067, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..
    4. Korenok Oleg & Edward L. Millner & Laura Razzolini, 2017. "Taking Aversion," Working Papers 1702, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dictator game; anonymity; gender; framing.;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles

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