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Taking Aversion

Author

Listed:
  • Korenok Oleg

    () (Department of Economics, VCU School of Business)

  • Edward L. Millner

    () (Department of Economics, VCU School of Business)

  • Laura Razzolini

    () (Department of Economics, VCU School of Business)

Abstract

We determine whether the moral cost of taking exceeds the moral cost of not giving. We design and conduct an experiment to determine whether a dictator prefers a giving game over a taking game when the payoff possibilities are identical and to measure the strength of the preference. We find that aversion to taking is prevalent and strong. Over 85% of the dictators in our experiment choose to play a giving game over a taking game when the payoff possibilities are identical and, on average, dictators are willing to sacrifice over 31% of their endowment to avoid taking.

Suggested Citation

  • Korenok Oleg & Edward L. Millner & Laura Razzolini, 2017. "Taking Aversion," Working Papers 1702, VCU School of Business, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:vcu:wpaper:1702
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taking; Dictator Game; Impure Altruism; Equivalent Variation;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • H30 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - General
    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods

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