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The Role of Social Networks and Peer Effects in Education Transmission

  • Sebastian Bervoets

    ()

    (CNRS, Greqam)

  • Antoni Calvó-Armengol

    (This author is deceased (Date: 03 Nov 2007))

  • Yves Zenou

    ()

    (Stockholm University, IFN)

We propose a dynastic model in which individuals are born in an educated or uneducated environment that they inherit from their parents. We study the role of social networks on the correlation in the parent-child educational status independent of any parent-child interaction. We show that the network reduces the intergenerational correlation, promotes social mobility and increases the average education level in the population. We also show that a planner that encourages social mobility also reduces social welfare, hence facing a tradeoff between these two objectives. When individuals choose the optimal level of social mobility, those born in an uneducated environment always want to leave their environment while the reverse occurs for individuals born in an educated environment.

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File URL: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/sites/default/files/_dt/2012/wp_2012_-_nr_09.pdf
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Paper provided by Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France in its series AMSE Working Papers with number 1209.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: 30 Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:aim:wpaimx:1209
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/en

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  5. Antoni Calvo-Armengol & Eleonora Patacchini & Yves Zenou, 2008. "Peer Effects and Social Networks in Education," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0814, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
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