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GINI DP 22: Institutional Reforms and Educational Attainment in Europe

  • Michela Braga

    ()

    (Facolta' di Scienze Politiche (DEAS), Universita' degli Studi di Milano)

  • Daniele Checchi

    ()

    (Universita'degli Studi di Milano, Facolta'di Scienze)

  • Elena Meschi

    ()

    (Institute of Education ,Room 405, University of London)

In this paper we analyse the effects of changes in the institutional design of the educational system on school attainment. In particular, we test whether alternative reforms have increased the average educational attainment of the population and whether various deciles of the education distribution have been differentially affected. We constructed a dataset of relevant reforms occurred at the national level over the last century, and match individual information to the most likely set-up faced when individual educational choices were undertaken. Thus our identification strategy relies on temporal and geographical variations in the institutional arrangements, controlling for time/country fixed effects, as well as for confounding factors. We also explore who are the individual most likely affected by the reforms. We also group different reforms in order to ascertain the prevailing attitudes of policy makers, showing that reforms can belong to either “inclusive” or “selective” in their nature. Finally we correlate these attitudes to political coalitions prevailing in parliament, finding support to the idea that left wing parties support reforms that are inclusive in nature, while right wing parties prefer selective ones.

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Paper provided by AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies in its series GINI Discussion Papers with number 22.

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Date of creation: Dec 2011
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Handle: RePEc:aia:ginidp:22
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  1. Guyon, Nina & Maurin, Eric & McNally, Sandra, 2010. "The Effect of Tracking Students by Ability into Different Schools: a Natural Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 7977, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Braga, Michela & Checchi, Daniele & Meschi, Elena, 2011. "Institutional Reforms and Educational Attainment in Europe: A Long Run Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 6190, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Jakubowski, Maciej & Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Porta, Emilio Ernesto & Wisniewski, Jerzy, 2010. "The impact of the 1999 education reform in Poland," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5263, The World Bank.
  4. Giorgio Brunello & Margherita Fort & Guglielmo Weber, 2009. "Changes in Compulsory Schooling, Education and the Distribution of Wages in Europe," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(536), pages 516-539, 03.
  5. Costas Meghir & Mårten Palme, 2004. "Educational reform, ability and family background," IFS Working Papers W04/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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