IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The U.S. Grain Consumption Landscape: Who Eats Grain, in What Form, Where, and How Much?


  • Lin, Biing-Hwan
  • Yen, Steven T.


The U.S. Government is promoting whole-grain foods, responding to mounting evidence of their association with maintaining a healthy weight and reducing the risk of heart problems and other diseases. This study compared Americans’ consumption of grains with the recommendations in the Government’s 2005 Dietary Guidelines, using data from USDA’s Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals, 1994-96 and 1998. The analysis confirmed a national preference for refined grains—only 7 percent of survey respondents met the 2005 whole-grain recommendation. The authors compared grain consumption by economic and demographic characteristics of consumers, and also examined the effects of consumers’ social, economic, and demographic characteristics and dietary perceptions and practices. The results suggest that consumers who perceive grain consumption as important and read food labels during shopping tend to eat more whole grains than other people. When data from more recent surveys are analyzed, results of the present study can serve as a baseline from which to gauge changes in the American diet and the consumption of whole grains.

Suggested Citation

  • Lin, Biing-Hwan & Yen, Steven T., 2007. "The U.S. Grain Consumption Landscape: Who Eats Grain, in What Form, Where, and How Much?," Economic Research Report 55967, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:55967

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Keane, Michael & Moffitt, Robert, 1998. "A Structural Model of Multiple Welfare Program Participation and Labor Supply," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(3), pages 553-589, August.
    2. Catsiapis, George & Robinson, Chris, 1982. "Sample selection bias with multiple selection rules : An application to student aid grants," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 351-368, April.
    3. Buzby, Jean C. & Farah, Hodan A. & Vocke, Gary, 2005. "Will 2005 Be the Year of the Whole Grains?," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, June.
    4. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Variyam, Jayachandran N. & Allshouse, Jane E. & Cromartie, John, 2003. "Food And Agricultural Commodity Consumption In The United States: Looking Ahead To 2020," Agricultural Economics Reports 33959, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Kim, Sung-Yong & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Capps, Oral, Jr., 2000. "The Effect Of Food Label Use On Nutrient Intakes: An Endogenous Switching Regression Analysis," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 25(01), July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:55967. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.