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Demand For Breakfast Cereals: Whole Grains Guidance And Food Choice

Author

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  • Ishdorj, Ariun
  • Jensen, Helen H.

Abstract

When using household-level data to examine consumer demand it is common to find that consumers purchase only a subset of the available goods, setting the demand for the remaining goods to zero. Ignoring such censoring of the dependent variables can lead to estimators with poor statistical properties and estimates that lead to poor policy decisions. In this paper we investigate household demand for four types of breakfast cereals, such as whole grain ready-to-eat, non-whole grain ready-to-eat, whole grain hot and non-whole grain hot cereals, using a censored Al- most Ideal Demand System (AIDS) and estimate the parameters of the model via Bayesian methods. Using household level scanner data (ACNielsen Homescan) we find that demand for all types of breakfast cereals is inelastic to changes in prices. The expenditure elasticity is slightly above unity for the whole grain ready-to-eat cereals suggesting that as the expenditure on cereals increases households will allocate proportionally more on whole-grain ready-to-eat cereals and less on other cereals.

Suggested Citation

  • Ishdorj, Ariun & Jensen, Helen H., 2010. "Demand For Breakfast Cereals: Whole Grains Guidance And Food Choice," 115th Joint EAAE/AAEA Seminar, September 15-17, 2010, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany 116445, European Association of Agricultural Economists;Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa115:116445
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/116445
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Steven T. Yen & Biing-Hwan Lin & David M. Smallwood, 2003. "Quasi- and Simulated-Likelihood Approaches to Censored Demand Systems: Food Consumption by Food Stamp Recipients in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(2), pages 458-478.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Dong, Diansheng & Carlson, Andrea & Rahkovsky, Ilya, 2017. "Potential dietary outcomes of changing relative prices of healthy and less healthy foods: The case of ready-to-eat breakfast cereals," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 77-88.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    AIDS model; Bayesian econometrics; censored; cereals; whole grains; Agricultural and Food Policy; Consumer/Household Economics; Demand and Price Analysis; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Food Security and Poverty; Health Economics and Policy; C11; C34; D12;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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