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Will Changing Demographics Affect U.S. Cheese Demand?

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Listed:
  • Davis, Christopher G.
  • Blayney, Donald P.
  • Dong, Diansheng
  • Yen, Steven T.
  • Johnson, Rachel J.

Abstract

U.S. cheese consumption has grown considerably over the last three decades. Using a censored demand model and Nielsen Homescan retail data, this study identifies price and non-price factors affecting the demand for differentiated cheese products. Own-price and expenditure elasticities for all of the cheese products are statistically significant and elastic. Results also reveal that a strong substitution relationship exists among all cheese products. Although demographic influences are generally smaller than those related to prices and expenditures, empirical findings show that household size, college educated female heads of household who are age 40 and older, residing in the South, Central, and Western regions of the United States, as well as Black heads of household, have positive statistically significant effects on consumers’ cheese purchases.

Suggested Citation

  • Davis, Christopher G. & Blayney, Donald P. & Dong, Diansheng & Yen, Steven T. & Johnson, Rachel J., 2011. "Will Changing Demographics Affect U.S. Cheese Demand?," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-15, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:104621
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Javier García-Enríquez & Cruz A. Echevarría, 2016. "Consistent Estimation of a Censored Demand System and Welfare Analysis: The 2012 VAT Reform in Spain," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 324-347, June.
    2. Bouhlal, Yasser & Capps, Oral, Jr. & Ishdorj, Ariun, 2013. "Estimating the Censored Demand for U.S. Cheese Varieties Using Panel Data: Impact of Economic and Demographic Factors," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151298, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; Marketing;

    JEL classification:

    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices

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