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Identifying The Effects Of Generic Advertising On The Household Demand For Fluid Milk And Cheese: A Two-Step Panel Data Approach

  • Schmit, Todd M.
  • Dong, Diansheng
  • Chung, Chanjin
  • Kaiser, Harry M.
  • Gould, Brian W.

A two-step model with sample selection is applied to panel data of U.S. households to estimate at-home demand for fluid milk and cheese, incorporating advertising expenditures. The model consistently accounts for sample-selection bias, unobserved household heterogeneity, and temporal correlation. Generic advertising programs for fluid milk and cheese were effective at increasing conditional purchase quantities, with very little effect on the probability of purchase. In contrast to aggregate studies, the long-run generic advertising elasticities for cheese were larger than for those of fluid milk. Advertising response varied considerably across sub-product classes, while branded advertising expenditures were largely insignificant.

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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2002)
Issue (Month): 01 (July)

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31088
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  1. Liu, Donald J. & Kaiser, Harry M. & Forker, Olan D. & Mount, Timothy D., 1990. "An Economic Analysis Of The U.S. Generic Dairy Advertising Program Using An Industry Model," Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 19(1), April.
  2. Diansheng Dong & J.S. Shonkwiler & Oral Capps, 1998. "Estimation of Demand Functions Using Cross-Sectional Household Data: The Problem Revisited," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(3), pages 466-473.
  3. Charlier, Erwin & Melenberg, Bertrand & van Soest, Arthur, 2000. "Estimation of a censored regression panel data model using conditional moment restrictions efficiently," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 25-56, March.
  4. Gould, Brian W. & Dong, Diansheng, 2000. "The Decision Of When To Buy A Frequently Purchased Good: A Multi-Period Probit Model," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 25(02), December.
  5. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  6. John Lenz & Harry M. Kaiser & Chanjin Chung, 1998. "Economic analysis of generic milk advertising impacts on markets in New York State," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(1), pages 73-83.
  7. Boehm, William T., 1975. "The Household Demand For Major Dairy Products In The Southern Region," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 7(02), December.
  8. Ward, Ronald W. & Moon, Wanki & Medina, Sara, 2001. "Measuring The Impact Of Generic Promotions Of U.S. Beef: An Application Of Double-Hurdle And Time Series Models," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 4(04).
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