IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/iaae18/275959.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Orange Fanta vs orange fruit: A novel measure of nutrition knowledge and women’s diet quality in Malawi

Author

Listed:
  • Schneider, K.
  • Masters, W.A.

Abstract

This paper uses a novel survey instrument to identify distinct components of nutrition knowledge, and test for links between knowledge and dietary choices in Southern Malawi. Our first aim is to distinguish respondents’ familiarity with recommended behaviors, such as when to start breastfeeding or introduce solid foods, from respondents’ factual knowledge about mechanisms, such as whether biscuits or papaya and orange fruit or orange Fanta contribute more to future health. We find knowledge of nutrition behaviors to be strongly associated with more schooling, older age and being female, while knowledge of mechanisms is associated only with training and employment as a health professional. We then test whether this expanded definition of nutrition knowledge is associated with dietary intake when controlling for other factors, and find only suggestive evidence for significant links interacting with age of respondents. These findings point to the need for knowledge surveys and public health behavior-change campaigns to address the kinds of information that might have the most influence on actual behavior, potentially including the mechanisms involved in food composition, food safety and disease transmission.

Suggested Citation

  • Schneider, K. & Masters, W.A., 2018. "Orange Fanta vs orange fruit: A novel measure of nutrition knowledge and women’s diet quality in Malawi," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275959, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:275959
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.275959
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/275959/files/2371.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlo Azzarri & Alberto Zezza & Beliyou Haile & Elizabeth Cross, 2015. "Does Livestock Ownership Affect Animal Source Foods Consumption and Child Nutritional Status? Evidence from Rural Uganda," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(8), pages 1034-1059, August.
    2. Rashid, Dewan Arif & Smith, Lisa C. & Rahman, Tauhidur, 2011. "Determinants of Dietary Quality: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2221-2231.
    3. Webb, Patrick & Block, Steven, 2004. "Nutrition Information and Formal Schooling as Inputs to Child Nutrition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 52(4), pages 801-820, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Katharina Lehmann-Uschner & Kati Kraehnert, 2017. "Food Intake and the Role of Food Self-Provisioning," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(8), pages 1303-1322, August.
    2. Sakaue, Katsuki, 2018. "Informal fee charge and school choice under a free primary education policy: Panel data evidence from rural Uganda," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 112-127.
    3. Chegere, Martin J. & Stage, Jesper, 2020. "Agricultural production diversity, dietary diversity and nutritional status: Panel data evidence from Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    4. E.V. Kruglikova & T.K. Blokhina & O.A. Karpenko, 2018. "Current Problems of Banking Supervision and Regulation: A New Evidence," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(4), pages 40-54.
    5. Sékou Amadou Traoré & Christoph Reiber & Bekele Megersa & Anne Valle Zárate, 2018. "Contribution of cattle of different breeds to household food security in southern Mali," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(3), pages 549-560, June.
    6. Del Prete, Davide & Ghins, Léopold & Magrini, Emiliano & Pauw, Karl, 2019. "Land consolidation, specialization and household diets: Evidence from Rwanda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 139-149.
    7. Rashid, Dewan Arif & Smith, Lisa C. & Rahman, Tauhidur, 2011. "Determinants of Dietary Quality: Evidence from Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2221-2231.
    8. Bühler, Dorothee & Hartje, Rebecca & Ulrike Grote, 2017. "Can household food security predict individual undernutrition? Evidence from Cambodia and Lao PDR," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-594, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    9. Ogada, M. & Radeny, M. & Recha, J. & Kimeli, P. & Rao, J. & Solomon, D., 2018. "Uptake and Impact of Climate-Smart Agriculture Technologies and Innovations in East Africa," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277499, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    10. Smart, Jenny Cairns & Tschirley, David & Smart, Francis, 2018. "Food System Transformation in Mozambique: An Assessment of Changing Diet Quality in the context of a Rising Middle Class," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 276052, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Tankari, Mahamadou Roufahi & Badiane, Ousmane, 2015. "Determinants of households' food diversity demand in Uganda," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 230230, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Patrick Webb & Andrew Thorne-Lyman, 2006. "Entitlement Failure from a Food Quality Perspective: The Life and Death Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Humanitarian Crises," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2006-140, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Kirk, Angeli & Kilic, Talip & Carletto, Calogero, 2018. "Composition of Household Income and Child Nutrition Outcomes Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 452-469.
    14. Headey, Derek & Hoddinott, John & Ali, Disha & Tesfaye, Roman & Dereje, Mekdim, 2015. "The Other Asian Enigma: Explaining the Rapid Reduction of Undernutrition in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 749-761.
    15. repec:ers:journl:v:volumexxi:y:2018:i:issue4:p:40-54 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Steckel, Richard H., 2009. "Heights and human welfare: Recent developments and new directions," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 1-23, January.
    17. Agee, Mark D., 2010. "Reducing child malnutrition in Nigeria: Combined effects of income growth and provision of information about mothers' access to health care services," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(11), pages 1973-1980, December.
    18. Kevin Serrem & Anna Dunay & Charlotte Serrem & Bridget Atubukha & Judit Oláh & Csaba Bálint Illés, 2020. "Paucity of Nutrition Guidelines and Nutrient Quality of Meals Served to Kenyan Boarding High School Students," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(8), pages 1-12, April.
    19. Choudhury, Samira & Headey, Derek D., 2018. "Household dairy production and child growth: Evidence from Bangladesh," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 150-161.
    20. Fábio Augusto Reis Gomes & Ari Francisco de Araujo Junior & Márcio Antônio Salvato, 2006. "Mortalidade Infantil No Brasil E No Sudeste: Determinantes E Perspectivas Para O Futuro," Anais do XII Semin·rio sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 12th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais], in: João Antonio de Paula & et alli (ed.),Anais do XII Seminário sobre a Economia Mineira [Proceedings of the 12th Seminar on the Economy of Minas Gerais], Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    21. Alessandro Romeo & Janice Meerman & Mulat Demeke & Antonio Scognamillo & Solomon Asfaw, 2016. "Linking farm diversification to household diet diversification: evidence from a sample of Kenyan ultra-poor farmers," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(6), pages 1069-1085, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; International Relations/Trade;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:275959. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/iaaeeea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.