IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Economic growth of farms: An empirical analysis on organic farming


  • Brenes Muñoz, Thelma
  • Lakner, Sebastian
  • Brümmer, Bernhard


This article investigates which factors influence the economic growth of organic farms. Organic farming has experienced a substantial growth in Germany since the beginning of the 1990s until today. Most organic farms are concentrated in the southern region of the country, Bavaria and Baden-Wuerttemberg. While some of these farms have expanded their business size, others have contracted, reconverted to conventional or ceased to operate. Using a panel data of 318 farms and a System GMM method, the economic growth of organic farms is analyzed. Regression results suggest that organic farms with high revenue from agriculture are less likely to grow than smaller farms. Growth is influenced by livestock intensity, multiple job holding, share of grasslands areas, soil quality and agri-environmental payments for organic farming.

Suggested Citation

  • Brenes Muñoz, Thelma & Lakner, Sebastian & Brümmer, Bernhard, 2012. "Economic growth of farms: An empirical analysis on organic farming," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126756, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126756

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Villatoro, Mario & Langemeier, Michael, 2006. "Factors Impacting Farm Growth," Journal of the ASFMRA, American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers.
    2. Kostov, Philip & Patton, Myles & Moss, Joan E. & McErlean, Seamus, 2005. "Does Gibrat's Law Hold Amongst Dairy Farmers in Northern Ireland?," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24775, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Dolev, Yuval & Kimhi, Ayal, 2008. "Does Farm Size Really Converge? The Role of Unobserved Farm Efficiency," Discussion Papers 45778, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Department of Agricultural Economics and Management.
    4. Upton, Martin & Haworth, Simon, 1987. "The Growth of Farms," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 14(4), pages 351-366.
    5. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-670, May.
    6. Christoph R. Weiss, 1999. "Farm Growth and Survival: Econometric Evidence for Individual Farms in Upper Austria," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(1), pages 103-116.
    7. Heshmati, Almas, 2000. "On the Growth of Micro and Small Firms," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 396, Stockholm School of Economics.
    8. Balmann, Alfons & Odening, Martin & Weikard, Hans-Peter & Brandes, Wilhelm, 1996. "Path-dependence without increasing returns to scale and network externalities," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 159-172, January.
    9. Blandina Oliveira & Adelino Fortunato, 2006. "Firm Growth and Liquidity Constraints: A Dynamic Analysis," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 139-156, October.
    10. Ayal Kimhi, 2000. "Is Part-Time Farming Really a Step in the Way Out of Agricultural?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(1), pages 38-48.
    11. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    12. Evans, David S, 1987. "Tests of Alternative Theories of Firm Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(4), pages 657-674, August.
    13. José Fariñas & Lourdes Moreno, 2000. "Firms' Growth, Size and Age: A Nonparametric Approach," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 17(3), pages 249-265, November.
    14. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    15. Cornelis Gardebroek & Kedir N. Turi & Jo H.M. Wijnands, 2010. "Growth dynamics of dairy processing firms in the European Union," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(3-4), pages 285-291, May.
    16. Offermann, Frank & Nieberg, Hiltrud & Zander, Katrin, 2009. "Dependency of organic farms on direct payments in selected EU member states: Today and tomorrow," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 273-279, June.
    17. Stolze, Matthias & Lampkin, Nicolas, 2009. "Policy for organic farming: Rationale and concepts," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 237-244, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Burja Camelia, 2015. "The Influence Of Relevant Factors On Farm Output Value: An Analysis Of Agricultural Holdings From Romania," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1, pages 124-129, February.

    More about this item


    farm-growth; organic farming; Gibrat’s law; part-time farming; Agricultural and Food Policy; Research Methods/ Statistical Methods;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:126756. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.