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How Do World Agricultural Commodity Price Spikes Affect The Income Distribution In Israel?

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  • Grethe, Harald
  • Siddig, Khalid H.A.
  • Goetz, Linde
  • Ihle, Rico

Abstract

We assess the distributional effects of the transmission of world market price shocks for the highly import dependent economy of Israel. We combine a CGE simulation with an empirical cointegration analysis for assessing the direction and extent of the connectedness of Israeli and world market prices. The Israeli and the world market for wheat are found to be integrated. Price shocks are completely transmitted from the world market to the domestic Israeli market. We find negative effects on the amount of domestic household income, on consumption and on welfare. Regressive expenditure effects dominate progressive income effects so that the resulting domestic income distribution appears to be more unequal.

Suggested Citation

  • Grethe, Harald & Siddig, Khalid H.A. & Goetz, Linde & Ihle, Rico, 2012. "How Do World Agricultural Commodity Price Spikes Affect The Income Distribution In Israel?," 52nd Annual Conference, Stuttgart, Germany, September 26-28, 2012 137154, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:gewi12:137154
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cudjoe, Godsway & Breisinger, Clemens & Diao, Xinshen, 2008. "Local impacts of a global crisis: Food price transmission and poverty impacts in Ghana," GSSP working papers 15, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Siddig, Khalid & Grethe, Harald, 2014. "International price transmission in CGE models: How to reconcile econometric evidence and endogenous model response?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 12-22.
    3. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
    4. Barry K. Goodwin & Nicholas E. Piggott, 2001. "Spatial Market Integration in the Presence of Threshold Effects," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(2), pages 302-317.
    5. Jochen Meyer & Stephan Cramon-Taubadel, 2004. "Asymmetric Price Transmission: A Survey," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 581-611.
    6. Kwiatkowski, Denis & Phillips, Peter C. B. & Schmidt, Peter & Shin, Yongcheol, 1992. "Testing the null hypothesis of stationarity against the alternative of a unit root : How sure are we that economic time series have a unit root?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1-3), pages 159-178.
    7. Johansen, Soren, 1995. "Likelihood-Based Inference in Cointegrated Vector Autoregressive Models," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198774501.
    8. Nicita, Alessandro, 2005. "Multilateral trade liberalization and Mexican households : the effect of the Doha development agenda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3707, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Siddig, Khalid & Grethe, Harald, 2014. "International price transmission in CGE models: How to reconcile econometric evidence and endogenous model response?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 12-22.

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    Keywords

    Agricultural trade; CGE; commodity prices; income distribution; Israel; Middle East; price transmission; Agrarhandel; CGE; Agrarpreise; Einkommensverteilung; Israel; Naher Osten; Preistransmission; Agricultural and Food Policy; International Relations/Trade;

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