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Impact of food inflation on poverty in the Philippines

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  • Fujii, Tomoki

Abstract

We simulate the impact of food inflation between June 2006 and June 2008 on poverty across different areas and between agricultural and non-agricultural households. We explicitly treat the spatial heterogeneity in food inflation and the differences in consumption and production patterns across households by merging household expenditure survey and price datasets at the provincial level or lower. Although some of the poor agricultural households may have escaped poverty, the poorest of the poor, whether they are in an agricultural household or not, are severely and adversely affected by the food inflation.

Suggested Citation

  • Fujii, Tomoki, 2013. "Impact of food inflation on poverty in the Philippines," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 13-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:39:y:2013:i:c:p:13-27
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2012.11.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Abrigo, Michael R.M., 2016. "Who Weans with Commodity Price Shocks? Rice Prices and Breastfeeding in the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2016-28, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    2. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Correcting Inflation with Financial Dynamic Fundamentals: Which Adjustments Matter in Africa?," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 64-73, April.
    3. Asongu, Simplice, 2015. "Financial development in Africa - a critical examination," MPRA Paper 82131, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:eee:wdevel:v:100:y:2017:i:c:p:69-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Fujii, Tomoki, 2017. "Dynamic Poverty Decomposition Analysis: An Application to the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 69-84.
    6. Rulyusa Pratikto & Mohamad Ikhsan & B. Raksaka Mahi, 2015. "Unequal Impact of Price Changes in Indonesia," Economics and Finance in Indonesia, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, vol. 61, pages 180-195, December.
    7. Tomoki Fujii, 2014. "Is urban food demand in the Philippines different from China?," Working Papers 18-2014, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    8. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "Fighting consumer price inflation in Africa: What do dynamics in money, credit, efficiency and size tell us?," Journal of Financial Economic Policy, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 39-60, April.
    9. Rodriguez-Takeuchi, Laura & Imai, Katsushi S., 2013. "Food price surges and poverty in urban Colombia: New evidence from household survey data," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 227-236.
    10. Coleman, Simeon, 2012. "Where Does the Axe Fall? Inflation Dynamics and Poverty Rates: Regional and Sectoral Evidence for Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2454-2467.
    11. Abrigo, Michael R.M., 2016. "Who Weans with Commodity Price Shocks? Rice Prices and Breastfeeding in the Philippines," Research Paper Series DP 2016-28, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    12. Sakai, Yoko & Estudillo, Jonna P. & Fuwa, Nobuhiko & Higuchi, Yuki & Sawada, Yasuyuki, 2017. "Do Natural Disasters Affect the Poor Disproportionately? Price Change and Welfare Impact in the Aftermath of Typhoon Milenyo in the Rural Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 16-26.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Non-parametric regression; Net consumption ratio; Global food crisis; Vulnerability;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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